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I currently have the following non templated code:

class Vector{ 
  public:
    double data[3];
 };
static Vector *myVariable;
void func() {
  myVariable->data[0] = 0.;
}
int main() {
  myVariable = new Vector();
  func();
}

I then want to template the dimension :

template<int DIM> class Vector{ 
  public:
    double data[DIM];
 };
static Vector<3>* myVariable;
void func() {
  myVariable->data[0] = 0.;
}
int main() {
  myVariable = new Vector<3>();
  func();
}

But I finally want to template my variable as well, with the dimension :

template<int DIM> class Vector{ 
  public:
    double data[DIM];
 };
template<int DIM> static Vector<DIM> *myVariable;

void func() {
  myVariable->data[0] = 0.;
  // or perform any other operation on myVariable
}
int main() {
  int dim = 3; 

  if (dim==3)
    myVariable = new Vector<3>();
  else
    myVariable = new Vector<4>();

  func();
}

However, this last version of the code produces an error : this static variable cannot be templated ("C2998: Vector *myVariable cannot be a template definition").

How could I possibly correct this error without a complete redesign (like inheriting the templated Vector class from a non templated class, which would require more expensive calls to virtual methods , or manually creating several myVariables of different dimensions) ? Maybe I'm just tired and don't see an obvious answer :s

Edit: Note that this code is a minimal working code to show the error, but my actual implementation templates the dimension for a full computational geometry class, so I cannot just replace Vector by an array. I see that there doesn't seem to be a solution to my problem.

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

It's been a while, but I've used constants in the template declaration before. I eventually went another direction with what I was working on, so I don't know if it'll ultimately be your solution either. I think the problem here is that any templated variable must know its template argument at compile time.

In your example, Vector<3> and Vector<4> are different types, and cannot be assigned to the same variable. That's why template<int DIM> static Vector<DIM> *myVariable doesn't make any sense; it doesn't have a discernible type.

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Would declaring myVariable as a Vector<any_big_number> and casting the new Vector<3> to this (Vector<any_big_number>*) work ? It seems to work in this specific example, but in a more general context...? –  WhitAngl Sep 22 '11 at 17:24
    
Note that I don't assign them to the same variable : the variable is only storing a pointer... it could have been a (void*). Actually, that might be the solution! –  WhitAngl Sep 22 '11 at 17:32
    
@WhitAngl You have to remember that constants in the template work pretty much like types...every different combination of template parameters used in your code lead to a different class being generated and compiled. It may be that it "works" due to the representation of the class by the compiler, and in this simple example that makes sense. However, it is not correct and the compiler ought to catch the type mismatch on a static cast I would think. –  Keith Layne Sep 22 '11 at 17:34
    
void* almost makes more sense, but no matter what you have to cast to use it...and I would think that it would need a dynamic_cast but I'm not sure. I think a different approach would maybe be better, it's just hard to say which one without more info. –  Keith Layne Sep 22 '11 at 17:36
template<int DIM> static Vector<DIM> *myVariable;

This is not allowed by the language specification. End of the story.

And since I don't understand the purpose of your code, or what you want to achieve, I cannot suggest any better alternative than simply suggesting you to try using std::vector<T>. It's also because I don't know how much am I allowed to redesign your code, and the way you use it, to make your code work.

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I understood that from the compile error. What is the best way to get the same expected result with a compilable code and with minimum changes ? –  WhitAngl Sep 22 '11 at 16:58
    
std::vector<> allocates the memory on the heap, like a new[]. This is a minimal code showing the compile error, but my actual code has a whole voronoi diagram class templated with the dimension, and is thousands lines long. Which is why I'd like at least the minimum amount of redesign... –  WhitAngl Sep 22 '11 at 17:10
    
@WhitAngl If there's a way to ensure that memory is allocated on the stack I don't know of it...but I don't know much. –  Keith Layne Sep 22 '11 at 17:42

You can use std::array to template-ize the dimension but you can't cast the pointer of one dimension to the pointer of another.

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my actual code templates the dimension not for a Vector class but for a whole geometric computation class... I edit my question to make it clearer. thanks! –  WhitAngl Sep 22 '11 at 17:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think I found!

template<int DIM> class Vector{ 
  public:
    double data[DIM];
 };
static void *myVariable;

template<int DIM>
void func() {
((Vector<DIM>*)myVariable)->data[0] = 0.;
  // or perform any other operation on myVariable
}
int main() {
  int dim = 3; 

  if (dim==3)
  {
    myVariable = (void*) new Vector<3>();
    func<3>();
  }
  else
  {
    myVariable = (void*) new Vector<4>();
    func<4>();
   }


}
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Vector<3> and Vector<4> are entirely different types and have no formal relation to one another. The fact that they are superficially similar from your point of view doesn't matter.

If you want them to be equivalent up to a certain type, we have a name for that: interfaces

template <typename Scalar = float>
class BasicVector {
public:
    typedef Scalar * iterator;
    virtual ~ BasicVector () {}

    virtual size_t   size  () const = 0;
    virtual iterator begin ()       = 0;
    virtual iterator end   ()       = 0;
};

template <unsigned N, typename Scalar = float>
class Vector : public BasicVector <Scalar> {
    Scalar m_elements [N];
public:
    using Scalar :: iterator;
    size_t   size  () const {return N;}
    iterator begin ()       {return m_elements;}
    iterator end   ()       {return m_elements + N;}
};

int main () {
    BasicVector * a;
    a = new Vector <3>;
    a = new Vector <4>;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Having a superclass requires the overhead of virtual method calls, which can be overly expensive for functions which can be called a bunch of time :s –  WhitAngl Sep 25 '11 at 17:02
    
True, but unless you're happy with void* and losing type safety, it's entirely necessary. –  spraff Sep 26 '11 at 7:52

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