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I setup a while loop where i want to choose r or h, i dont want to use forloops but i want to use a switch why is it when i enter r or h it keeps repeating a million times the cout for that case? I cant get it to just say it once..

while (chooseMove == 'r' or 'h')
{
    switch (chooseMove) 
    {
    case 'r':
            cout << "you chose r";

        break;
    case 'h':
        cout << "you chose h";
        break;
    }




} 

I also tried it with forloops and had the same problem i cant figure it out

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you may want to add a << endl in there! –  mkb Sep 22 '11 at 17:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you mean is while (chooseMove == 'r' or chooseMove == 'h'). What you've currently written is equivalent to ((chooseMove == 'r') or ('h')), and 'h' evaluates as true.


Maybe you were also asking for help with the input logic:

char c;
bool success = false;

while (std::in >> c)
{
  switch(c) {
    case 'r': /* ... */ success = true; break;
    case 'h': /* ... */ success = true; break;
  }

  if (success) break;
}

This will also terminate if the input stream is closed, and you can use success to inspect the success of the operation.

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4  
Is 'or' really a C++ operator? –  BlackBear Sep 22 '11 at 17:22
1  
@BlackBear: yes, it's an alternative to ||. E.g. see here (the header file itself isn't needed). Another popular alternative is ??!??!. –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 17:23
    
cool! I always found || annoying ;) thanks –  BlackBear Sep 22 '11 at 17:24
    
Just tested it. Wow! "or" compiles with g++ and vim syntax highlighting recognizes it as a keyword. –  Jonathan Sternberg Sep 22 '11 at 17:24
    
you and mooing duck both have half the answer. –  mkb Sep 22 '11 at 17:25

Because that's what you programmed it to do.

If you want the loop to stop or pause (and say, wait for input), you should add that code into the loop.

while (chooseMove == 'r' or chooseMove == 'h')
{
    switch (chooseMove) 
    {
    case 'r':
            cout << "you chose r";

        break;
    case 'h':
        cout << "you chose h";
        break;
    }
    std::cin >> chooseMove;  //stop and wait for more input
}
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Holy crpa i didnt even realize that. I see because it now asks for the value again it needs to know where to go... –  sonicboom Sep 22 '11 at 17:23
    
you and kerrek s.b. both have half the answer. –  mkb Sep 22 '11 at 17:25
    
oh, I focused on the "doesn't stop" problem, and he on the "always" part. :D I fixed mine. –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 17:28

This is a problem:

while (chooseMove == 'r' or 'h')

Try this instead:

while ((chooseMove == 'r') || (chooseMove == 'h'))

When you write (how did this even compile? or isn't C++):

chooseMove == 'r' or 'h'

It is interpreted as:

(chooseMove == 'r') or ('h')

The statement 'h' is always true, so the while loop runs forever.

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or actually is C++. § 2.13 –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 17:29
    
WHAAAT? Time to make mah code readable! –  Blender Sep 22 '11 at 17:32
    
IMO: I use || since every coder knows about it and is familiar with it, whereas most people thing or is an error :( –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 17:33

What does chooseMove == 'r' or 'h' mean? According to the C++ standard, this is grouped as (chooseMove == 'r') or ('h'); the implicit conversion of 'h' to bool then results in (chooseMove == 'r') or ('h' != 0). The second condition will always be true.

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while (chooseMove == 'r' or 'h')

which is equivalent to this:

while ( (chooseMove == 'r')  or true)
//same as while ( (chooseMove == 'r')  || true)

So this is infinite loop. Note that or and || are same thing.

What you want is this:

while ( (chooseMove == 'r')  or (chooseMove == 'h'))
//same as while ( (chooseMove == 'r')  || (chooseMove == 'h'))
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