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Is it possible to have a HashMap return a default value for all keys that are not found in the set?

I am using Java.

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You can check for key existence and return default. Or extend the class and modify the behavior. or even you can use null - and put some check wherever you want to use it. –  SudhirJ Sep 22 '11 at 18:10
    
This is related / duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4833336/… some other options are discussed there. –  Mark Butler Dec 24 '12 at 8:58

8 Answers 8

up vote 30 down vote accepted

There's no Map implementation that does this exactly but it would be trivial to implement your own by extending HashMap:

public class DefaultHashMap<K,V> extends HashMap<K,V> {
  protected V defaultValue;
  public DefaultHashMap(V defaultValue) {
    this.defaultValue = defaultValue;
  }
  @Override
  public V get(Object k) {
    return containsKey(k) ? super.get(k) : defaultValue;
  }
}
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8  
Just to be precise, you may want to adjust the condition from (v == null) to (v == null && !this.containsKey(k)) in case they purposely added a null value. I know, this is just a corner case, but the author may run into it. –  Adam Paynter Sep 22 '11 at 18:17
    
@AdamPaynter: yes, good point, I've updated my code. –  maerics Sep 22 '11 at 18:21
    
I changed the condition from !this.containsValue to !super.containsKey and added some other methods that may need overriding. –  emory Sep 22 '11 at 18:40
    
@maerics: I noticed that you used !this.containsValue(null). This is subtly different from !this.containsKey(k). The containsValue solution will fail if some other key has been explicitly assigned a value of null. For example: map = new HashMap(); map.put(k1, null); V v = map.get(k2); In this case, v will still be null, correct? –  Adam Paynter Sep 22 '11 at 18:42
8  
In general, I think this is a bad idea - I'd push the defaulting behavior into the client, or a delegate that doesn't claim to be a Map. In particular, the lack of valid keySet() or entrySet() will cause problems with anything that expects the Map contract to be respected. And the infinite set of valid keys that containsKey() implies is likely to cause bad performance that's hard to diagnose. Not to say, though, that it might not serve some particular purpose. –  Ed Staub Sep 22 '11 at 18:48

Use Commons' DefaultedMap if you don't feel like reinventing the wheel, e.g.,

Map<String, String> map = new DefaultedMap<>("[NO ENTRY FOUND]");
String surname = map.get("Surname"); 
// surname == "[NO ENTRY FOUND]"

You can also pass in an existing map if you're not in charge of creating the map in the first place.

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8  
+1 although sometimes its easier to reinvent the wheel than to introduce large dependencies for tiny slices of simple functionality. –  maerics Sep 22 '11 at 19:39
    
@maerics True enough; I rarely have small-enough projects any more :( –  Dave Newton Sep 15 '12 at 13:38
1  
and funny thing is, that many projects that I work with already have something like this in classpath (either Apache Commons or Google Guava) –  bartosz.r Feb 20 '13 at 15:53

You can simply create a new class that inherits HashMap and add getDefault method. Here is a sample code:

public class DefaultHashMap<K,V> extends HashMap<K,V> {
    public V getDefault(K key, V defaultValue) {
        if (containsKey(key)) {
            return get(key);
        }

        return defaultValue;
    }
}

I think that you should not override get(K key) method in your implementation, because of the reasons specified by Ed Staub in his comment and because you will break the contract of Map interface (this can potentially lead to some hard-to-find bugs).

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1  
You've got a point in not overriding the get method. On the other hand - your solution doesn't allow using the class via interface, which might often be the case. –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Jan 21 at 7:59

It does this by default. It returns null.

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@Larry, Seems a little silly to me to subclass HashMap just for this functionality when null is perfectly fine. –  mrkhrts Sep 22 '11 at 18:11
6  
It's not fine if you're using a NullObject pattern, though, or don't want to scatter null-checks throughout your code--a desire I completely understand. –  Dave Newton Aug 24 '12 at 13:34

In Java 8, use Map.getOrDefault. It takes the key, and the value to return if no matching key is found.

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1  
getOrDefault is very nice, but requires the default definition every time the map is accessed. Defining a default value once would also have readability benefits when creating a static map of values. –  ach Aug 4 at 14:19

Can't you just create a static method that does exactly this?

private static <K, V> V getOrDefault(Map<K,V> map, K key, V defaultValue) {
    return map.containsKey(key) ? map.get(key) : defaultValue;
}
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Not directly, but you can extend the class to modify its get method. Here is a ready to use example: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Collections-Data-Structure/ExtendedVersionofjavautilHashMapthatprovidesanextendedgetmethodaccpetingadefaultvalue.htm

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/**
 * Extension of TreeMap to provide default value getter/creator.
 * 
 * NOTE: This class performs no null key or value checking.
 * 
 * @author N David Brown
 *
 * @param <K>   Key type
 * @param <V>   Value type
 */
public abstract class Hash<K, V> extends TreeMap<K, V> {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1905150272531272505L;

    /**
     * Same as {@link #get(Object)} but first stores result of
     * {@link #create(Object)} under given key if key doesn't exist.
     * 
     * @param k
     * @return
     */
    public V getOrCreate(final K k) {
        V v = get(k);
        if (v == null) {
            v = create(k);
            put(k, v);
        }
        return v;
    }

    /**
     * Same as {@link #get(Object)} but returns specified default value
     * if key doesn't exist. Note that default value isn't automatically
     * stored under the given key.
     * 
     * @param k
     * @param _default
     * @return
     */
    public V getDefault(final K k, final V _default) {
        V v = get(k);
        return v == null ? _default : v;
    }

    /**
     * Creates a default value for the specified key.
     * 
     * @param k
     * @return
     */
    abstract protected V create(final K k);
}

Example Usage:

protected class HashList extends Hash<String, ArrayList<String>> {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 6658900478219817746L;

    @Override
        public ArrayList<Short> create(Short key) {
            return new ArrayList<Short>();
        }
}

final HashList haystack = new HashList();
final String needle = "hide and";
haystack.getOrCreate(needle).add("seek")
System.out.println(haystack.get(needle).get(0));
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