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I want to merge about 8 *.csv files into one.

An example file:

ID, Average
34, 4.5
35, 5.6
36, 3.4

Another file could be:

ID, Max
34, 6
35, 7
36, 4

And I need the output to be:

ID, Average, Max
34, 4.5, 6
35, 5.6, 7
36, 3.4, 4

This only half works.... it appends all the data into the same two columns.

import glob, string

outfile = open('<directory>/<fileName>.csv','a')    
files = glob.glob(r"<directory>/*.csv")

for y in files:
    newfile = open(y,'r+')       
    data = newfile.read()
    newfile.close()
    outfile.writerow(y)

How can I append the data to new columns, and not repeat the "ID" field?

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migrated from gis.stackexchange.com Sep 22 '11 at 18:08

This question came from our site for cartographers, geographers and GIS professionals.

1  
there is a csv library for python: docs.python.org/library/csv.html . But prior to jumping into code: think about your files: do you have the same id everywhere? Is it in the same order? –  johanvdw Sep 22 '11 at 18:38
    
@S.Lott - thanks for the edit. This question makes a lot more sense now. –  cosmosis Sep 22 '11 at 20:32
1  
@cosmosis: Ordinarily I try to get the author to fix their formatting. But in this case, the formatting was so bad -- and so hard to explain exactly how bad it was -- that I decided to fix it. Bad formatting is a teaching moment. Folks learn from reformatting their questions. But this was a little interesting and a lot hard to read. –  S.Lott Sep 22 '11 at 22:04
1  
@S.Lott - I think people learn, not only from reformatting questions, but also from answering questions, so that they learn what information is important/needed. It's too bad the question wasn't originally asked better, I would have answered it differently using some code I recently wrote. But Spencer's answer was good. –  cosmosis Sep 22 '11 at 22:25
    
@cosmosis: "I think people learn, ... also from answering questions"? What? What does that have to do with anything? Very confusing comment. "I would have answered it differently". What? Why not change your answer, then? –  S.Lott Sep 23 '11 at 1:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have three problems here.

  1. Read in each of the csv files
  2. Merge on a common field
  3. Write the merged data to a new csv file

Code

#!/usr/bin/env python
import argparse, csv
if __name__ == '__main__':

    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='merge csv files on field', version='%(prog)s 1.0')
    parser.add_argument('infile', nargs='+', type=str, help='list of input files')
    parser.add_argument('--out', type=str, default='temp.csv', help='name of output file')
    args = parser.parse_args()
    data = {}
    fields = []

    for fname in args.infile:
        with open(fname, 'rb') as df:
            reader = csv.DictReader(df)
            for line in reader:
                # assuming the field is called ID
                if line['ID'] not in data:
                    data[line['ID']] = line
                else:
                    for k,v in line.iteritems():
                        if k not in data[line['ID']]:
                            data[line['ID']][k] = v
                for k in line.iterkeys():
                    if k not in fields:
                        fields.append(k)
            del reader

    writer = csv.DictWriter(open(args.out, "wb"), fields, dialect='excel')
    # write the header at the top of the file
    writer.writeheader()
    writer.writerows(data)
    del writer

Note that this will ignore data with an identical field name.

An alternative to the parser section is this:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import glob, csv
if __name__ == '__main__':

    infiles = glob.glob('./*.csv')
    out = 'temp.csv'
    data = {}
    fields = []

    for fname in infiles:
        df = open(fname, 'rb')
        reader = csv.DictReader(df)
        for line in reader:
            # assuming the field is called ID
            if line['ID'] not in data:
                data[line['ID']] = line
            else:
                for k,v in line.iteritems():
                    if k not in data[line['ID']]:
                        data[line['ID']][k] = v
            for k in line.iterkeys():
                if k not in fields:
                    fields.append(k)
        del reader
        df.close()

    writer = csv.DictWriter(open(out, "wb"), fields, dialect='excel')
    # write the header at the top of the file
    writer.writeheader()
    writer.writerows(data)
    del writer
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent turnkey solution! –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 22 '11 at 19:28
    
Thank you, though it seems the code block didn't come out quite right. –  Spencer Rathbun Sep 22 '11 at 19:32
    
Czed just commented on my answer that he doesn't have the argparse module. I gave some suggestions for work arounds, but I thought maybe you would want a crack at it. –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 23 '11 at 15:20
    
@Czed Python 2.7 cleanly installs next to the standard python install on linux. On debian sudo apt-get install python2.7 would install the package, and then python2.7 yourScript.py will run it with python2.7 instead of the default. –  Spencer Rathbun Sep 23 '11 at 17:40
    
@SpencerRathbun: Thanks for the alternative to the parser section. I assigned a directory for glob.glob, and the output file location and name. Running it gives me a syntax error at line 11 (with open (fname) as df:). I thought it could be a tab issue, but doesn't look like it. –  Czed Sep 23 '11 at 19:28
data1 = ['1,blue,red',
         '2,purple,yellow',
         '3,white,brown']
data2 = ['1,fee',
         '2,fie',
         '3,foe',
         '4,fum']
data_table = dict(s.split(',',1) for s in data1)

for line in data2:
    key, _ = line.split(',',1)
    print ','.join((line, data_table.get(key,',')))

gives:

1,fee,blue,red
2,fie,purple,yellow
3,foe,white,brown
4,fum,,

And here is a csv version:

import csv
data1 = ['1,blue,red',
         '2,purple,yellow',
         '3,white,brown']
data2 = ['1,fee',
         '2,fie',
         '3,foe',
         '4,fum']
with open('out.txt','w') as f:
    combined = csv.writer(f)
    data1 = ['1,blue,red',
             '2,purple,yellow',
             '3,white,brown']
    data2 = ['1,fee',
             '2,fie',
             '3,foe',
             '4,fum']
    data_table = dict((row[0], row[1:]) for row in csv.reader(data1))
    for row in csv.reader(data2):
        key = row[0]
        combined.writerow(row + data_table.get(key, ['','']))
share|improve this answer
    
But using your solution with his example, wouldn't the output be: ID, Average 34, 4.5 35, 5.6 36, 3.4, Average, Max 34, 4.5, 6 35, 5.6, 7 36, 3 ? I thought he wanted a bit more meshing of the tables rather than just a straight joining minus the first column. –  cosmosis Sep 22 '11 at 19:09
    
@osmosis: He wasn't clear about what needed to be stripped out, but clearly asked How can I append the data to new columns, and not repeat the "ID" field? The technique presented for not duplicating the "ID" is easily generalizable to other fields. Absent further clarification, I felt it was best to use dummy data. If Czed follows up with further questions, I will happily amend my answer. But for now, I think it stands on its own. –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 22 '11 at 19:19
    
@StevenRumbalski: Yeah that's right. Looking for a technique to append atleast 8 *.csv files horizontally. Developing a GRASS GIS application. Currently my output gives me multiple csv files with two columns, an 'ID' field, and a corresponding stat (average, mean, max, kurtosis, etc.). The outputs are useful, but it would be nice to have one clean file, rather than 8.I tried Spencer Rathbun's code, but it looks like I'll need to use python 2.7 to import argparse. –  Czed Sep 23 '11 at 13:01
    
@Czed: In Spencer Rathbun's code argparse just serves to get the input and output filenames. You could recode it for the now depricated optparse module. Or you could parse sys.argv manually. Or you could use this snippet from your original code: files = glob.glob(r"<directory>/*.csv"). Or you could hardcode the names in. –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 23 '11 at 15:18

Could txtselect work, perhaps? I haven't used it, but the author is going to do a talk on it at pyArkansas next month.

share|improve this answer

I'm a big fan of atpy to read in tables - it's rather versatile and what I've used mostly. Also if you look at these tables as arrays, rather than just large tables you want to slice together, then it might be easier to work with. Assuming that the list of IDs are in the same order for every file, you read in one file first and then append to each row:

data = open('bigtable.txt','w')
table1 = atpy.Table("path/Table1.csv", type="ascii", delimiter=",")
table2 = atpy.Table("path/Table1.txt", type="ascii", delimiter="|")

c = 9   #number of columns
a = []
for ii in range(len(table1)):
    a[0].append(table1[ii][0])
    a[1].append(table1[ii][1])
    a[2].append(table2[ii][1])  #...etc. it was hard to tell from your example what 
                                # columns you wanted where
    data.write("%s\n" % a)

data.close
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