Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The most interesting C++ question I've encountered recently goes as follows:

We determined (through profiling) that our algorithm spends a lot of time in debug mode in MS Visual Studio 2005 with functions of the following type:

MyClass f(void)
{
      MyClass retval;
      // some computation to populate retval

      return retval;
}

As most of you probably know, the return here calls a copy constructor to pass out a copy of retval and then the destructor on retval. (Note: the reason release mode is very fast for this is because of the return value optimization. However, we want to turn this off when we debug so that we can step in and nicely see things in the debugger IDE.)

So, one of our guys came up with a cool (if slightly flawed) solution to this, which is, create a conversion operator:

MyClass::MyClass(MyClass *t)
{
      // construct "*this" by transferring the contents of *t to *this   
      // the code goes something like this
      this->m_dataPtr = t->m_dataPtr;  

      // then clear the pointer in *t so that its destruction still works
      // but becomes 'trivial'
      t->m_dataPtr = 0;
}

and also changing the function above to:

MyClass f(void)
{
      MyClass retval;
      // some computation to populate retval

      // note the ampersand here which calls the conversion operator just defined
      return &retval;      
}

Now, before you cringe (which I am doing as I write this), let me explain the rationale. The idea is to create a conversion operator that basically does a "transfer of contents" to the newly constructed variable. The savings happens because we're no longer doing a deep copy, but simply transferring the memory by its pointer. The code goes from a 10 minute debug time to a 30 second debug time, which, as you can imagine, has a huge positive impact on productivity. Granted, the return value optimization does a better job in release mode, but at the cost of not being able to step in and watch our variables.

Of course, most of you will say "but this is abuse of a conversion operator, you shouldn't be doing this kind of stuff" and I completely agree. Here's an example why you shouldn't be doing it too (this actually happened:)

  void BigFunction(void)
  {
        MyClass *SomeInstance = new MyClass;

        // populate SomeInstance somehow

        g(SomeInstance);

        // some code that uses SomeInstance later
        ...
  }

where g is defined as:

  void g(MyClass &m)
  {
      // irrelevant what happens here.
  }

Now this happened accidentally, i.e., the person who called g() should not have passed in a pointer when a reference was expected. However, there was no compiler warning (of course). The compiler knew exactly how to convert, and it did so. The problem is that the call to g() will (because we've passed it a MyClass * when it was expecting a MyClass &) called the conversion operator, which is bad, because it set the internal pointer in SomeInstance to 0, and rendered SomeInstance useless for the code that occured after the call to g(). ... and time consuming debugging ensued.

So, my question is, how do we gain this speedup in debug mode (which has as direct debugging time benefit) with clean code that doesn't open the possibility to make such other terrible errors slip through the cracks?

I'm also going to sweeten the pot on this one and offer my first bounty on this one once it becomes eligible. (50 pts)

share|improve this question
5  
Visual Studio 2005? If you were to switch to 2010, you could use move semantics, which would do exactly what you're hacking up manually with the pointer trick. –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 18:20
    
Is g required to modify m? –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 18:24
2  
Kudos to your colleague for independently inventing move semantics, though, even if you didn't have the ability to change the language to make the syntax nice :-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 22 '11 at 18:38
1  
@Steve Jessop I will transfer the kudos. –  Chris A. Sep 22 '11 at 18:41
1  
Chris, just wondering - can't you just change MyClass f(void) to void f(MyClass&), so the caller will pass the MyClass to be set, instead of receiving one, and save the copying? –  eran Sep 22 '11 at 18:42
show 2 more comments

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If your definition of g is written the same as in your code base I'm not sure how it compiled since the compiler isn't allowed to bind unnamed temporaries to non-const references. This may be a bug in VS2005.

If you make the converting constructor explicit then you can use it in your function(s) (you would have to say return MyClass(&retval);) but it won't be allowed to be called in your example unless the conversion was explicitly called out.

Alternately move to a C++11 compiler and use full move semantics.

(Do note that the actual optimization used is Named Return Value Optimization or NRVO).

share|improve this answer
    
"This may be a bug in VS2005." IIRC it's a feature, meaning that it's wrong but they did it on purpose. –  Steve Jessop Sep 22 '11 at 18:39
    
I like the idea of making a explicit conversion. This seems to solve most of the problems, even if the conversion operator is still "dangerous" –  Chris A. Sep 22 '11 at 18:43
    
Not conforming to the standard seems to be the definition of bug to me. That said it could have been implemented as a language extension. –  Mark B Sep 22 '11 at 18:43
1  
@Mark B: well, the standard only requires a diagnostic, not that an ill-formed program fails to compile. So as long as /Za either disables the feature or warns about it, they're legal. –  Steve Jessop Sep 22 '11 at 19:13
    
I've made this the answer because what we actually implemented was making the conversion operator explicit. –  Chris A. Sep 29 '11 at 21:15
add comment

You need to use something called "swaptimization".

MyClass f(void)
{
      MyClass retval;
      // some computation to populate retval

      return retval;
}
int main() {
    MyClass ret;
    f().swap(ret);
}

This will prevent a copy and keep the code clean in all modes.

You can also try the same trick as auto_ptr, but that's more than a little iffy.

share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to remember how people emulated && before, and couldn't remember. Good answer! –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 18:49
    
+1 Interesting... and for the stupid among us, how is swap defined? –  Chris A. Sep 22 '11 at 18:51
    
@Chris A.: it's an analog of your tricky constructor. Have a look at std::swap template –  Andy T Sep 22 '11 at 19:00
    
Good point. In my answer I assumed there was an unstated constraint, that the questioner doesn't want to change the calling code of f, just f itself. But it may be that we can do without that. –  Steve Jessop Sep 22 '11 at 19:00
    
@Chris: by the looks of your dodgy constructor, swap should be implemented as std::swap(this->m_dataPtr, t->m_dataPtr);, and there needs to be a default constructor of MyClass that sets m_dataPtr to null. –  Steve Jessop Sep 22 '11 at 19:02
show 7 more comments

The problem is occuring because you're using MyClass* as a magic device, sometimes but not always. Solution: use a different magic device.

class MyClass;
class TempClass { //all private except destructor, no accidental copies by callees
    friend MyClass;

    stuff* m_dataPtr; //unfortunately requires duplicate data
                      //can't really be tricked due to circular dependancies.

    TempClass() : m_dataPtr(NULL) {}
    TempClass(stuff* p) : m_dataPtr(p) {}
    TempClass(const TempClass& p) : m_dataPtr(p) {}
public:
    ~TempClass() {delete m_dataPtr;}
};

class MyClass {
    stuff* m_dataPtr;

    MyClass(const MyClass& b) {
        m_dataPtr = new stuff();
    }
    MyClass(TempClass& b) {
        m_dataPtr = b.m_dataPtr ;
        b.m_dataPtr = NULL;
    }
    ~MyClass() {delete m_dataPtr;}
    //be sure to overload operator= too.
    TempClass f(void) //note: returns hack.  But it's safe
    {
        MyClass retval;
        // some computation to populate retval   
        return retval;
    }
    operator TempClass() {
        TempClass r(m_dataPtr);
        m_dataPtr = nullptr;
        return r;
    }

Since TempClass is almost all private (friending MyClass), other objects cannot create, or copy TempClass. This means the hack can only be created by your special functions when clearly told to, preventing accidental usage. Also, since this doesn't use pointers, memory can't be accidentally leaked.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Move semantics have been mentioned, you've agreed to look them up for education, so that's good. Here's a trick they use.

There's a function template std::move which turns an lvalue into an rvalue reference, that is to say it gives "permission" to move from an object[*]. I believe you can imitate this for your class, although I won't make it a free function:

struct MyClass;
struct MovableMyClass {
    MyClass *ptr;
    MovableMyClass(MyClass *ptr) : ptr(ptr) {}
};

struct MyClass {
    MyClass(const MovableMyClass &tc) {
        // unfortunate, we need const reference to bind to temporary
        MovableMyClass &t = const_cast<MovableMyClass &>(tc);
        this->m_dataPtr = t.ptr->m_dataPtr;
        t.ptr->m_dataPtr = 0;
    }
    MovableMyClass move() {
        return MovableMyClass(this);
    }
};

MyClass f(void)
{
    MyClass retval;
    return retval.move();
}

I haven't tested this, but something along those lines. Note the possibility of doing something const-unsafe with a MovableMyClass object that actually is const, but it should be easier to avoid ever creating one of those than it is to avoid creating a MyClass* (which you've found out is quite difficult!)

[*] Actually I'm pretty sure I've over-simplified that to the point of being wrong, it's actually about affecting what overload gets chosen rather than "turning" anything into anything else as such. But causing a move instead of a copy is what std::move is for.

share|improve this answer
add comment

A different approach, given your special scenario:

Change MyClass f(void) (or operator+) to something like the following:

MyClass f(void)
{
   MyClass c;
   inner_f(c);
   return c;
}

And let inner_f(c) hold the actual logic:

#ifdef TESTING
#   pragma optimize("", off)
#endif

inline void inner_f(MyClass& c)
{
   // actual logic here, setting c to whatever needed
}

#ifdef TESTING
#   pragma optimize("", on)
#endif

Then, create an additional build configurations for this kind of testing, in which TESTING is included in the preprocessor definitions.

This way, you can still take advantage of RVO in f(), but the actual logic will not be optimized on your testing build. Note that the testing build can either be a release build or a debug build with optimizations turned on. Either way, the sensitive parts of the code will not be optimized (you can use the #pragma optimize in other places too, of course - in the code above it only affects inner_f itself, and not code called from it).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Possible solutions

  • Set higher optimization options for the compiler so it optimizes out the copy construction
  • Use heap allocation and return pointers or pointer wrappers, preferably with garbage collection
  • Use the move semantics introduced in C++11; rvalue references, std::move, move constructors
  • Use some swap trickery, either in the copy constructor or the way DeadMG did, but I don't recommend them with a good conscience. An inappropriate copy constructor like that could cause problems, and the latter is a bit ugly and needs easily destructible default objects which might not be true for all cases.

  • +1: Check and optimize your copy constructors, if they take so long then something isn't right about them.

share|improve this answer
1  
Concerning the last point, I disagree. My classes are special purpose image class that typically contain a few MB of data each. –  Chris A. Sep 24 '11 at 1:40
    
Definitely implement one of the other solutions then. You absolutely can't afford pointless copying of megabytes of data. –  Frigo Sep 24 '11 at 1:49
1  
The copying doesn't happen in release mode with named return value optimization. The problem is (and I thought I explained this) that debug mode is prohibitively slow. Turning on higher optimizations doesn't help because then I can't step into functions and get all the debugger niceties. –  Chris A. Sep 24 '11 at 1:57
add comment

I would prefer to simply pass the object by reference to the calling function when MyClass is too big to copy:

void f(MyClass &retval)  // <--- no worries !
{
  // some computation to populate retval
}

Just simple KISS principle.

share|improve this answer
    
We'd have to change too much code to do this. As an example of why, think about functions like operator+(). It's just not an option –  Chris A. Sep 29 '11 at 21:19
add comment

Okay I think I have a solution to bypass the Return Value Optimization in release mode, but it depends on the compiler and not guaranteed to work. It is based on this.

MyClass f (void)
{
    MyClass retval;
    MyClass dummy;

    //  ...

    volatile bool b = true;
    if b ? retval : dummy;
}

As for why the copy construction takes so long in DEBUG mode, I have no idea. The only possible way to speed it up while remaining in DEBUG mode is to use rvalue references and move semantics. You already discovered move semantics with your "move" constructor that accepts pointer. C++11 gives a proper syntax for this kind of move semantics. Example:

//  Suppose MyClass has a pointer to something that would be expensive to clone.
//  With move construction we simply move this pointer to the new object.

MyClass (MyClass&& obj) :
    ptr (obj.ptr)
{
    //  We set the source object to some trivial state so it is easy to delete.
    obj.ptr = NULL;
}

MyClass& operator = (MyClass&& obj) :
{
    //  Here we simply swap the pointer so the old object will be destroyed instead of the temporary.
    std::swap(ptr, obj.ptr);
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
"Okay I think I have a solution to bypass the Return Value Optimization in release mode" we don't want to bypass it. Named return value optimization is good. –  Chris A. Sep 29 '11 at 21:18
    
For release mode debugging obviously. Have you tried to implement my other suggestion, move semantics? –  Frigo Sep 30 '11 at 14:59
    
We can't because we have to be backward compatible for MSVC 2005. –  Chris A. Sep 30 '11 at 17:03
    
Use a dummy parameter before or after the MyClass* parameter in the constructor implementing move semantics then, so its purpose is clear and you can not mix it up with some strange pointer-based copy constructor. It might also be possible to create a Move<T> class to clearly express your intent of move semantics, but that could interfere with returning temporaries. –  Frigo Oct 4 '11 at 6:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.