Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume that we have the following HTML strings.

string A = " <table width=325><tr><td width=325>test</td></tr></table>"
string B = " <<table width=325><tr><td width=325>test</td></table>"

How can we validate A or B in C# according to HTML specifications?

A should return true whereas B should return false.

share|improve this question
    
You could parse the string and add up all of the < and > characters. If either of them is an odd amount you could assume it's invalid (for this case) –  Cory Danielson Sep 22 '11 at 18:43
    
I think both of the html you have provided completely incorrect according to spec. –  tugberk Sep 22 '11 at 18:49
    
There is a number of HTML tags in HTML4 and HTML5 that do not require the use of a closing tag for valid HTML: optgroup, option, p, tbody, td, tr, tfoot, thead, th –  alex Sep 22 '11 at 18:53
    
I fixed the </tr> on string A. –  Cas Sakal Sep 22 '11 at 19:03
    
Yes as @alex said, counting < and > does not work at all. –  Cas Sakal Sep 22 '11 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

http://markbeaton.com/SoftwareInfo.aspx?ID=81a0ecd0-c41c-48da-8a39-f10c8aa3f931

This guy has written a .NET wrapper for HTMLTidy. I haven't used it but it may be what you are looking for.

share|improve this answer

I think This answer will help you...

For this specific case you can use HTML Agility Pack to assert if the HTML is well formed or if you have tags not opened.

var htmlDoc = new HtmlDocument();

htmlDoc.LoadHtml(
    "WAVEFORM</u> YES, <u>NEGATIVE AUSCULTATION OF EPIGASTRUM</u> YES,");

foreach (var error in htmlDoc.ParseErrors)
{
    // Prints: TagNotOpened
    Console.WriteLine(error.Code);
    // Prints: Start tag <u> was not found
    Console.WriteLine(error.Reason); 
}

Checking a HTML string for unopened tags

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using an existing library instead of trying to hack it together yourself. –  Mike Chamberlain Sep 23 '11 at 6:14
    
just a warning, whilst the above example works, this: "<p>example<p>" doesnt trigger any parser errors. –  Andrew Bullock Feb 26 '13 at 12:04

One point to start with is checking if it's valid XML.

by the way, I think both your examples are incorrect as you've left out the </tr> from both.

share|improve this answer
2  
HTML is not valid XML, XHTML is. –  alex Sep 22 '11 at 18:50
    
@alex, that's true but at least it could be a start as all other checks would be really hard –  thekip Sep 22 '11 at 18:51
    
There is a number of HTML tags in HTML4 and HTML5 that do not require the use of a closing tag for valid HTML: optgroup, option, p, tbody, td, tr, tfoot, thead, th –  alex Sep 22 '11 at 18:53
    
@thekip As long as there is one single HTML element with no closing tag, the entire XML-validity check would be pointless. And there's a pretty good chance there is one. –  Arve Systad Sep 22 '11 at 18:57
    
XML is much more strict than HTML and XMLReader does not give proper results. –  Cas Sakal Sep 22 '11 at 19:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.