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I've got a bunch of users in my database and I want to reset all their usernames to the first letter of their first name, plus their full last name. As you can imagine, there are some dupes. In this scenario, I'd like to add a "2" or "3" or something to the end of the username. How would I write a query to generate a unique username like this?

UPDATE user
SET username=lower(concat(substring(first_name,1,1), last_name), UNIQUETHINGHERE)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE bar LIKE foo;

INSERT INTO bar (id,user,first,last)
(SELECT f.id,CONCAT(SUBSTRING(f.first,1,1),f.last,
     (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM foo f2
         WHERE SUBSTRING(f2.first,1,1) = SUBSTRING(f.first,1,1)
               AND f2.last = f.last AND f2.id <= f.id
         )),f.first,f.last from foo f);

DROP TABLE foo;
RENAME TABLE bar TO foo;

This relies on a primary key id, so for each record inserted into bar, we only count duplicates found in foo with id less than bar.id.

Given foo:

select * from foo;
+----+------+--------+--------+
| id | user | first  | last   |
+----+------+--------+--------+
|  1 | aaa  | Roger  | Hill   | 
|  2 | bbb  | Sally  | Road   | 
|  3 | ccc  | Fred   | Mount  | 
|  4 | ddd  | Darren | Meadow | 
|  5 | eee  | Sharon | Road   | 
+----+------+--------+--------+

The above INSERTs into bar, resulting in:

select * from bar;
+----+----------+--------+--------+
| id | user     | first  | last   |
+----+----------+--------+--------+
|  1 | RHill1   | Roger  | Hill   | 
|  2 | SRoad1   | Sally  | Road   | 
|  3 | FMount1  | Fred   | Mount  | 
|  4 | DMeadow1 | Darren | Meadow | 
|  5 | SRoad2   | Sharon | Road   | 
+----+----------+--------+--------+

To remove the "1" from the end of user names,

INSERT INTO bar (id,user,first,last)
(SELECT f3.id,
        CONCAT(
            SUBSTRING(f3.first,1,1),
            f3.last,
            CASE f3.cnt WHEN 1 THEN '' ELSE f3.cnt END),
        f3.first,
        f3.last
 FROM (
    SELECT
        f.id,
        f.first,
        f.last,
        (
            SELECT COUNT(*) 
            FROM foo f2
            WHERE SUBSTRING(f2.first,1,1) = SUBSTRING(f.first,1,1)
            AND f2.last = f.last AND f2.id <= f.id
        ) as cnt
    FROM foo f) f3)
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what's bar? why are there triple quotes at the end? care to explain this a bit? –  Mark Sep 22 '11 at 19:38
    
@Mark: bar is an empty table like foo. After inserting records into bar, you can drop foo and rename bar --> foo. The triple quotes were an artifact of Python, where I tested the code. –  unutbu Sep 22 '11 at 19:43
    
Ah. I wanted to just update the user table, but I guess I can easily transfer it back. That's pretty cool. I'd also leave off the number if it's "1", but again, that should be easy to do. Nice! Thanks a lot! Edit: Like your comment explains. –  Mark Sep 22 '11 at 19:45

As a two-parter:

SELECT max(username)
FROM user
WHERE username LIKE concat(lower(concat(substring(first_name,1,1),lastname), '%')

to retrieve the "highest" username for that name combo. Extract the numeric suffix, increment it, then insert back into the database for your new user.

This is racy, of course. Two users with the same first/last names might stomp on each other's usernames, depending on how things work out. You'd definitely want to sprinkle some transaction/locking onto the queries to make sure you don't have any users conflicting.

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I was hoping to do this with pure MySQL... this would require me to loop over all the users, no? –  Mark Sep 22 '11 at 19:27

Nevermind.... I just found the dupes:

select LOWER(CONCAT(SUBSTRING(first_name,1,1),last_name)) as new_login,count(* ) as cnt from wx_user group by new_login having count(* )>1;

And set those ones manually. Was only a handful.

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