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One may not always know the Type of an object at compile-time, but may need to create an instance of the Type. How do you get a new object instance from a Type?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 308 down vote accepted

The Activator class within the root System namespace is pretty powerful.

There are a lot of overloads for passing parameters to the constructor and such. Check out the documentation at: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.activator.createinstance.aspx

Here are some simple examples:

ObjectType instance = (ObjectType)Activator.CreateInstance(objectType);

ObjectType instance = (ObjectType)Activator.CreateInstance("MyNamespace.ObjectType, MyAssembly");
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Exactly! Thanks Karl! –  Bomboca Sep 13 '10 at 16:41
9  
Glad to have finally found this, but second call is not exactly right, missing a quote and parms reversed, should be: ObjectType instance = (ObjectType)Activator.CreateInstance("MyAssembly","MyNamespace.ObjectType"); –  kevinc Jun 3 '13 at 10:56
2  
You need to call 'Unwrap()' to get the actual type of object you want: ConcreteType instance = (ConcreteType)Activator.CreateInstance(objectType).Unwrap(); –  Ε Г И І И О Mar 13 at 15:08

If you want to use the default constructor then the solution using System.Activator presented earlier is probably the most convenient. However, if the type lacks a default constructor or you have to use a non-default one, then an option is to use reflection or System.ComponentModel.TypeDescriptor. In case of reflection, it is enough to know just the type name (with its namespace).

Example using reflection:

ObjectType instance = 
    (ObjectType)System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().CreateInstance(
        typeName: objectType.FulName, // string including namespace of the type
        ignoreCase: false,
        bindingAttr: BindingFlags.Default,
        binder: null,  // use default binder
        args: new object[] { args, to, constructor },
        culture: null, // use CultureInfo from current thread
        activationAttributes: null
    );

Example using TypeDescriptor:

ObjectType instance = 
    (ObjectType)System.ComponentModel.TypeDescriptor.CreateInstance(
        provider: null, // use standard type description provider, which uses reflection
        objectType: objectType,
        argTypes: new Type[] { types, of, args },
        args: new object[] { args, to, constructor }
    );
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        public AbstractType New
    {
        get
        {
            return (AbstractType) Activator.CreateInstance(GetType());
        }
    }
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Wouldnt the generic "new T();" work?

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6  
Actually, it would in a generic class/method, but not for a given "Type". –  boomhauer Sep 19 '10 at 4:40

If this is for something that will be called a lot in an application instance, it's a lot faster to compile and cache dynamic code instead of using the activator or ConstructorInfo.Invoke(). Two easy options for dynamic compilation are compiled Linq Expressions or some simple IL opcodes and DynamicMethod. Either way, the difference is huge when you start getting into tight loops or multiple calls.

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ObjectType instance = (ObjectType)Activator.CreateInstance(objectType);

The Activator class has a generic variant that makes this a bit easier:

  ObjectType instance = Activator.CreateInstance<ObjectType>();
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2  
Except this doesn't work for runtime Type t. –  Kevin P. Rice Apr 5 '12 at 6:58
1  
@Kevin Of course. Such an operation can’t work in a statically typed language because it doesn’t make sense. You cannot invoke methods on an object of unknown type. In the meantime (= since writing this answer) C# has got the dynamic construct which does allow such constructs but for most purposes this answer still covers it. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 7 '12 at 15:47
    
I was drawn to this question because I recently needed to create boxed value types of an unknown Type t in order to use reflection's FieldInfo.SetValue(object) to populate field members of a struct or class that hold value types (int, char, enum, etc.) To do this, I used Type t = FieldInfo.FieldType to determine the field type, then created the proper boxed object using Convert.ChangeType(value, t) where value is a ulong. For enums (where t.IsEnum), I use Enum.ToObject(t, value). I suppose this is really just a cast-and-box, not a new(). :-) –  Kevin P. Rice Apr 7 '12 at 21:03

tags2k:

If the issue is that the class is throwing an exception on instantiation, this will also be thrown when default(T) is called

This is not true. default() does not call constructors, it initializes to null for reference types (classes), 0 for value types (eg. ints), and initializes each member of a struct to one of null or 0, based on the same rules.

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This is more a comment than an answer. –  Peter Sep 2 at 7:25
    
You're right, but I don't think commenting was available in 2008 when this answer was written :P –  Ch00k Sep 2 at 11:13
    
Ah, ok then. I tried to remove my downvote but it won't take it. Sorry. –  Peter Sep 2 at 12:34

One implementation of this problem is to attempt to call the parameter-less constructor of the Type:

    public static object GetNewObject(Type t)
{
try
{
return t.GetConstructor(new Type[] { }).Invoke(new object[] { });
}
catch
{
return null;
}
}

Here is the same approach, contained in a generic method:

    public static T GetNewObject<T>()
{
try
{
return (T)typeof(T).GetConstructor(new Type[] { }).Invoke(new object[] { });
}
catch
{
return default(T);
}
}
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1  
Exception driven programming? This seems like a very poor implementation when you can simply reflect over the type to determine constructors. –  Firoso Mar 22 at 21:57

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