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I need to get one data from a collection (get() calls in the range of 100K for a single file processing).

public class DemoCollection {

    private Map<GroupCriteria, GroupData> collectionHolder = new ConcurrentHashMap<GroupCriteria, GroupData>();

    /**
     * 
     * @param groupCriteria
     *            GroupCriteria
     * @return GroupData
     */
    public GroupData getGroupForGroupingCriteriaOne(GroupCriteria groupCriteria) {
        GroupData groupData = null;
        if (collectionHolder.containsKey(groupCriteria)) {
            groupData = collectionHolder.get(groupCriteria);
        } else {
            // Get from database
        }
        return groupData;
    }

    /**
     * 
     * @param groupCriteria
     *            GroupCriteria
     * @return GroupData
     */
    public GroupData getGroupForGroupingCriteriaTwo(GroupCriteria groupCriteria) {
        GroupData groupData = null;
        if ((groupData = collectionHolder.get(groupCriteria)) == null) {
            // GEt from database
        }
        return groupData;
    }
}

Which is the best practice in this regard ? The approach one (getGroupForGroupingCriteriaOne) , two (getGroupForGroupingCriteriaTwo) or neither ?

Usually I ignore these premature optimization things, but since the get() calls are too huge I'm little bothered.

Could you please advice ?

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider using Guava's MapMaker:

private ConcurrentMap<GroupCriteria, GroupData> collectionHolder = new MapMaker()
        .makeComputingMap(
           new Function<GroupCriteria, GroupData>() {
              @Override
              public GroupData apply(GroupCriteria key) {
                 //get from database and return
              }
        });

This ConcurrentMap will handle all concurrent requests for you. See the MapMaker documentation for a list of all configurable features of the produced map.

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do the further gets fetch the data from local collection than from DB ? –  nobody Sep 22 '11 at 19:21
    
Infact I'm using Guava's mapMaker but not the computingMap with overridden apply Method. –  nobody Sep 22 '11 at 19:26
    
@nobody - Once it's cached in the map, further calls to get() will just retrieve it from there. This is the beauty of MapMaker (or the cache-centric CacheBuilder coming in r10). Even if there are simultaneous requests for a particular entry, apply() will only be run on one thread while the others wait for it to return. –  Paul Bellora Sep 22 '11 at 19:38
    
why CacheBuilder is not available for download now ? Any idea ? –  nobody Sep 22 '11 at 19:39
    
@nobody - r10 is currently available as a release candidate. The actual release is coming soon. –  Paul Bellora Sep 22 '11 at 19:43
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getGroupForGroupingCriteriaTwo is the way to go because you're asking the map to do the key lookup once instead of twice.

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getGroupForGroupingCriteriaTwo looks perfectly reasonable. getGroupForGroupingCriteriaOne makes two lookups to the Map - one for searching the 'key' and the other for fetching the value.

However, I am hoping that after fetching from database, you would put the object into the Map (as a cache) so that the same can be used from the Map next time, rather than querying.

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Yeah , sure I'm doing that. –  nobody Sep 22 '11 at 19:21
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Version two is probably better for the reasons pointed out by others, but why not be less cryptic...

public GroupData getGroupForGroupingCriteriaThree(GroupCriteria groupCriteria) {
    GroupData groupData = collectionHolder.get(groupCriteria);

    return groupData != null ? groupData : callGetDataFromDB();
}
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In general I agree with the responses that getGroupForGroupingCriteriaTwo is better since it accesses the map only once, however your concern that since the map holds 100K items the access time will be high is misplaced.

You are using a ConcurrentHashMap, HashMap lookups have computation complexity of O(1) which means irrespective of the size of the data, these calls will return in constant time.

This optimization will not improve the performance. If you are really concerned about improving performance, consider using a proper caching framework.

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This is one thing I never knew.Thanks a lot for the info.I do not require a full fledged caching framework. Its like, if the load on server is less I put the database representation of data in memory and process it there. Otherwise I write to DB and fetch on the other side and do the processing. I had a look at ehcache, but felt I don't require most of the things. Thanks for the input. –  nobody Sep 22 '11 at 19:44
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