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Okay, so after struggling with trying to debug this, I have finally given up. I'm a beginner in C++ & Data Structures and I'm trying to implement Heap Sort in C++. The code that follows gives correct output on positive integers, but seems to fail when I try to enter a few negative integers.

Please point out ANY errors/discrepancies in the following code. Also, any other suggestions/criticism pertaining to the subject will be gladly appreciated.

//Heap Sort
#include <iostream.h>
#include <conio.h>
int a[50],n,hs;
void swap(int &x,int &y)
{
    int temp=x;
    x=y;
    y=temp;
}
void heapify(int x)
{
    int left=(2*x);
    int right=(2*x)+1;
    int large;
    if((left<=hs)&&(a[left]>a[x]))
    {
        large=left;
    }
    else
    {
        large=x;
    }
    if((right<=hs)&&(a[right]>a[large]))
    {
        large=right;
    }
    if(x!=large)
    {
        swap(a[x],a[large]);
        heapify(large);
    }
}
void BuildMaxHeap()
{
    for(int i=n/2;i>0;i--)
    {
        heapify(i);
    }
}
void HeapSort()
{
    BuildMaxHeap();
    hs=n;
    for(int i=hs;i>1;i--)
    {
        swap(a[1],a[i]);
        hs--;
        heapify(1);
    }
}
void main()
{
    int i;
    clrscr();
    cout<<"Enter length:\t";
    cin>>n;
    cout<<endl<<"Enter elements:\n";
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++)       //Read Array
    {
        cin>>a[i];
    }
    HeapSort();
    cout<<endl<<"Sorted elements:\n";
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++)       //Print Sorted Array
    {
        cout<<a[i];
        if(i!=n)
        {
            cout<<"\t";
        }
    }
    getch();
}

I've been reading up on Heap Sort but I'm not able to grasp most of the concept, and without that I'm not quite able to fix the logical error(s) above.

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1  
I've added the homework tag. If this isn't, feel free to remove it. –  brc Sep 22 '11 at 19:14
    
what happens when you use negative numbers on input? Give an example input and output. –  Lou Franco Sep 22 '11 at 19:15
    
what are errors? –  BЈовић Sep 22 '11 at 19:16
2  
What on earth is <iostream.h>? –  Karl Knechtel Sep 22 '11 at 19:45
1  
@Karl My grand-grand-father's iostream. –  pmr Sep 22 '11 at 19:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You set hs after calling BuildMaxHeap. Switch those two lines.

hs=n;
BuildMaxHeap();
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1  
Or make hs=n; the first line of BuildMaxHeap (after a look into my algorithm book) –  Christian Ammer Sep 22 '11 at 20:23
    
Perfect! This solved it completely. Thanks! –  Siddharth Sep 27 '11 at 11:23

When I implemented my own heapsort, I had to be extra careful about the indices; if you index from 0, children are 2x+1 and 2x+2, when you index from 1, children are 2x and 2x+1. There were a lot of silent problems because of that. Also, every operation needs a single well-written siftDown function, that is vital.

Open up Wikipedia at the Heapsort and Binary heap articles and try to rewrite it more cleanly, following terminology and notation where possible. Here is my implementation as well, perhaps it can help.

Hmmm now that I checked your code better, are you sure your siftDown/heapify function restricts sifting to the current size of the heap?

Edit: Found the problem! You do not initialize hs to n before calling BuildMaxHeap().

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Thank you. Your implementation looks great. Looking through the terminology and notations now. –  Siddharth Sep 27 '11 at 11:27

I suspect it's because you're 1-basing the array. There's probably a case where you're accidentally 0-basing it but I can't spot it in the code offhand.

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I suspected the same thing initially. That maybe one of the conditional statements accidentally 0-bases the array. But I've tried looking through it a few times. Can't seem to spot it! –  Siddharth Sep 22 '11 at 19:58

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