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I am writing a method in Java in which the user is supposed to enter a license plate for a car. The fist two signs must be capital letters, the third sign must be a digit between 1 and 9, and the last 4 digits must be digits between 0 and 9. If the user does not enter this properly, an error message should appear, and the user will be asked to input the license plate again.

After testing the problem I have discovered that if I deliberately make many different mistakes over and over, and then finally enter the license plate correctly, the program still informs me that my input is wrong. I am having a hard time knowing how to construct this, since it is supposed to take into account so many possible errors. My code presently looks like this for the method in question:

    char sign;
System.out.print("License plate: ");
    licensePlate = input.next();

    for (int index = 0; index < 2; indeks++) {
        sign = licensePlate.charAt(indeks);
        while (sign < 'A' || sign > 'Z') {
            System.out.println(licensePlate + " is not a valid license plate (two big letters + five digits where the first digit can not be 0)");
            System.out.print("License plate: ");
            licensePlate = input.next(); }
    }

    while (licensePlate.charAt(2) < '1' || licensePlate.charAt(2) > '9') {
        System.out.println(licensePlate + " is not a valid license plate (two big letters + five digits where the first digit can not be 0)");
    System.out.print("License plate: ");
    licensePlate = input.next(); }

    for (int counter = 3; counter < 7; counter++) {
        sign = licensePlate.charAt(teller);
        while (sign < '0' || sign > '9') {
            System.out.println(licensePlate + " is not a valid license plate (two big letters + five digits where the first digit can not be 0)");
    System.out.print("License plate: ");
    licensePlate = input.next(); }  
    }

    carObject.setLicensePlate(licensePlate); 

If anyone can help me writing this properly I would be extremely grateful!

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3 Answers 3

The problem is that you're taking new input every so often, but then not starting again. It would be worth having a separate method to perform the test, like this:

boolean gotPlate = false;    
String plate = null;

while (!gotPlate) {
    System.out.print("License plate: ");
    plate = input.next();
    gotPlate = checkPlate(plate);
}
carObject.setLicensePlate(plate);

Now put the rest of your logic into the checkPlate method:

static boolean checkPlate(String plate) {
    // Fixed typos here, by the way...
    for (int index = 0; index < 2; index++) {
        char sign = plate.charAt(index);
        if (sign < 'A' || sign > 'Z') {
            System.out.println(plate + " is not a valid license plate " + 
               "(two big letters + five digits where the first digit" + 
               " can not be 0)");
            return false;
        }
    }
    // Now do the same for the next bits...


    // At the end, if everything is valid, return true
    return true;
}

I'll leave you to do the checking for '0' etc - but hopefully you can see the benefits in structuring the "testing" part separately from the "getting input" part.


EDIT: Original answer...

Sounds like you want a regular expression:

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("[A-Z]{2}[1-9][0-9]{4}");

Full sample:

import java.util.regex.*;

public class Test {

    private static final Pattern PLATE_PATTERN =
        Pattern.compile("[A-Z]{2}[1-9][0-9]{4}");

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        checkPlate("AB10000");
        checkPlate("AB10000BBB");
        checkPlate("AB1CCC0BBB");
    }

    static void checkPlate(String plate) {
        boolean match = PLATE_PATTERN.matcher(plate).matches();
        System.out.println(plate + " correct? " + match);
    }
}

Of course, that doesn't tell you which bit was wrong. It also doesn't help you work out what was wrong with your original code... see earlier part.

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Thank you, but we have not learned this in our course yet. I am sure we are supposed to use loops or if/else statements. –  Kristian Sep 22 '11 at 19:20
    
@Kristian: Okay, editing... –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '11 at 19:24
    
@Kristian: Okay, have a look now - see if the change in structure helps you. A lot of good programming is really down to working out how to break up your program. –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '11 at 19:29
    
This looks like a homework assignment. Surely it's not a great idea to give the answer almost entirely in full... –  HXCaine Sep 22 '11 at 19:29
    
Thank you very much. I will try to solve this based on these ideas! –  Kristian Sep 22 '11 at 19:35
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Don't use a character based approach. Take the whole string and use the regex list above and either fail or pass it as a one time operation. You don't need that level of control here to get a pass/fail result.

HTH, James

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You should really use a regular expression for this.

However, if you want to fix the problem with your code: the problem with your approach is that you are asking for input again after you've done some validation.

For example, if the first two characters are correct, the second loop will validate the input single-handedly. If that's wrong and it asks for input again, the user could input the first two characters incorrectly and that check won't be done because the code will have passed the first stage and is now only checking the second stage.

If you were to continue with your approach, you should make one large loop which would repeat if anything is wrong in the input and do all of the checks again in order.

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Thank you. This is what I figured out is the problem too. But I have a hard time constructing one large loop that would take into account all the possible errors. Also, like I mentioned above, we have not learned about regex yet, so I am positive we are supposed to solve this through the use of an overarching loop. –  Kristian Sep 22 '11 at 19:29
    
Okay, well you can make use of 'continue' and 'break', and instead of using many loops, put in some if-statements that will 'continue' the loop (try again) if the input is wrong, or 'break' if it reaches a stage where the input is definitely correct –  HXCaine Sep 22 '11 at 19:32
    
Thanks for the input. Will use this too. BTW, you are right in that this is a homework assignment, but we are allowed to ask for help if we're stuck. I find it takes shorter time to ask here, then to send an e-mail to any of the TAs in my class :) –  Kristian Sep 22 '11 at 19:36
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