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I started using git and have been using it for couple of months now, and I am curious if my workflow is correct. I work from two different places on the project. here are the stages of my workflow:

  1. I pull the project from remote repo
  2. make a local branch for a new feature
  3. make changes and commit
  4. merge the branch with master
  5. push to the remote

is this correct way of working on the project?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As Amber said :

First, let's just make something clear: there is no single "correct" workflow for Git. There are merely workflows that work - and specifically, workflows that work for you.

There is a good post on a blog about a good git workflow :

A successful Git branching model

You should read this post, it's really cool and you can adapt the workflow to your needs. In a nutshell, the workflow proposed by the blog post schematized like this :

A successful git branching model

I have adopted this workflow for a while. I try to always respect the workflow, whether it's a teamwork or working alone.

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First, let's just make something clear: there is no single "correct" workflow for Git. There are merely workflows that work - and specifically, workflows that work for you.

The workflow you have outlined is typically referred to as a "feature branch" workflow (where you create a branch to work on a given feature/fix/whatever, and then merge it back), and is a perfectly legitimate workflow.

If you only ever work on a single feature at a time, you could choose to simply commit directly to master, then push the updated version. This becomes difficult, however, if you're working on multiple different features simultaneously (whereas a feature branch workflow handles many simultaneous features gracefully).

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