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here is my scenario:

class SomeBaseClass
{
     public void foo(String str)
     {
     .......
     }
     public void foo(String strs[])
     {
     .......
     }
}

class MyClass extends SomeBaseClass
{
     public void foo(String str)
     {
           super.foo(str);
     }
     public void foo(String strs[])
     {
           throw new RuntimeException("only one input please!");
     }
}

The logic is pretty simple. "SomeBaseClass" is 3rd party tool that i cannot modify. I want to limit its functionality and don't want to allow foo(String strs[]).

the problem is that inside SomeBaseClass foo(Sting str) internally calls foo(String strs[]). Hence when i call foo(String str) of MyClass, I get a runtime exception. How can I tell the SomeBaseClassclass to use SomeBaseClass::foo(String strs[]) and all other classes to use MyClass ::foo(String strs[])

share|improve this question
    
Wild guess, have you tried this.foo()? (I don't know Java that well, though.) – Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 19:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps over engg but inside MyClass.foo(String strs[]) you can check if the caller is SomeBaseClass.foo(String str), if yes, let the call go thru to super.foo(String) else throw RuntimeException.

To find the caller check StackTrace.

share|improve this answer
2  
Using stack trace may decrease performance significantly, though there's another way to determine whether to call super or throw an error. In foo (String) you can mark that super call is allowed (using local class variable if thread-safety isn't required or using ThreadLocal otherwise) and check the flag in foo (String[]). But wrapper is a better practice and in case of thread-safety will surely work faster. – Andrei LED Sep 22 '11 at 19:56
    
Good point (abt the flag), guess it's the best option, (you should add it). It's also possible to make it thread safe of course (with a little effort). I do agree abt the performance hit otherwise, but I took it that its implicit/clear. – Kashyap Sep 22 '11 at 20:01
1  
both stacktrace and using flag worked. thanks Kashyap. I preferred using stack trace. – PC. Sep 27 '11 at 5:38
    
Great! Do note that even in my opinion Andrei's soln is better than mine. I mean the one with teh flag. But whatever sails ur boat. :) – Kashyap Sep 27 '11 at 16:59
1  
@kashyap: i do agree its useful for some cases. but it my case the architecture is multi-multi threaded. i cannot risk thread-safety. – PC. Sep 30 '11 at 18:31

Consider writing a wrapper

class MyClass extends SomeBaseClass
{
    private SomeBaseClass impl = new SomeBaseClass ();

    public void foo(String str)
    {
        impl.foo(str);
    }

    public void foo(String strs[])
    {
        throw new RuntimeException("only one input please!");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I think it ought to be pointed out that every single method inherited from SomeBaseClass will have to be forwarded to impl, and if SomeBaseClass's vendor decides to quietly add a new member function in a new version, this'll quietly break. – NPE Sep 22 '11 at 19:51
1  
Am I missing something here? MyClass still extends SomeBaseClass, so how exactly is it this stopped: MyClass.foo(String)->SomeBaseClass.foog(String)->MyClass.foo(String[])->t‌​hrow .... Got it. :) – Kashyap Sep 22 '11 at 19:57
    
Here impl.foo(str) impl is an instance of SomeBaseClass so it will not lead to MyClass.foo (String[]). – Andrei LED Sep 22 '11 at 20:01
2  
in my original implementation, SomeBaseClass has like 100's of methods and properties. its completely bad practice to make such an implementation as there will a lot of maintenance / up-gradation issues. – PC. Sep 27 '11 at 5:31

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