Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wanted to clarify if I understand this correctly:

  • == -> is a reference comparison, i.e. both objects point to the same memory location
  • .equals() -> evaluates to the comparison of values in the objects

Am I correct in my understanding ?

share|improve this question
12  
yeah, pretty much –  John Kane Sep 22 '11 at 19:40
1  
Yes, spot on. You can think of .equals() as meaningfully equivalent –  vikingsteve Jul 8 '13 at 13:30

7 Answers 7

up vote 116 down vote accepted

In general, the answer to your question is "yes", but...

  • it's .equals(...) though (first letter is not capitalized).
  • equals will only compare what it is written to compare, no more, no less.
  • if equals is not overridden, it defaults to the Object#equals(Object o) method. Per the Object API this is the same as ==; that is, it returns true if and only if both variables refer to the same object, if their references are one and the same.
  • Always remember to override hashCode if you override equals so as not to "break the contract".
share|improve this answer
25  
Overridden - overloaded is different. –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '11 at 19:40
1  
@JonSkeet: thanks for the correction! Answer corrected. :) –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 22 '11 at 19:42
16  
I think it would be most complete to say that Object's implementation of equals is the same as ==. You may not know what classes in your hierarchy override it. If none of the parents of your class override it, then Object's implementation will go. But choosing not to override it in your class doesn't mean it isn't overridden in someone else class that you inherit from. –  corsiKa Aug 4 '12 at 16:06
1  
@Gray: Edited. I'm not sure if this is the clarification that you mean. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 15 '13 at 21:53
3  
+1 for always reminding people to override hashCode if you're overriding equals. –  Patrick Feb 21 at 16:18

With respect to the String class:

The equals() method compares the "value" inside String instances (on the heap) irrespective if the two(2) object references refer to the same String instance or not. If any two(2) object references of type String refer to the same String instance then great! If the two(2) object references refer to two(2) different String instances .. it doesn't make a difference. Its the "value" (that is: the contents of the character array) inside each String instance that is being compared.

On the other hand, the "==" operator compares the value of two object references to see whether they refer to the same String instance. If the value of both object references "refer to" the same String instance then the result of the boolean expression would be "true"..duh. If, on the other hand, the value of both object references "refer to" different String instances (even though both String instances have identical "values", that is, the contents of the character arrays of each String instance are the same) the result of the boolean expression would be "false".

As with any explanation, let it sink in.

I hope this clears things up a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
so for strings == is reference equals aswell? ie works the same as for other objects? –  Jonny Leeds Feb 20 at 14:12

You will have to override the equals function (along with others) to use this with custom classes.

The equals method compares the objects.

The == binary operator compares mem addresses.

share|improve this answer

There are some small differences depending whether you are talking about "primitives" or "Object Types"; the same can be said if you are talking about "static" or "non-static" members; you can also mix all the above...

Here is an example (you can run it):

public final class MyEqualityTest
{
    public static void main( String args[] )
    {
        String s1 = new String( "Test" );
        String s2 = new String( "Test" );

        System.out.println( "\n1 - PRIMITIVES ");
        System.out.println( s1 == s2 ); // false
        System.out.println( s1.equals( s2 )); // true

        A a1 = new A();
        A a2 = new A();

        System.out.println( "\n2 - OBJECT TYPES / STATIC VARIABLE" );
        System.out.println( a1 == a2 ); // false
        System.out.println( a1.s == a2.s ); // true
        System.out.println( a1.s.equals( a2.s ) ); // true

        B b1 = new B();
        B b2 = new B();

        System.out.println( "\n3 - OBJECT TYPES / NON-STATIC VARIABLE" );
        System.out.println( b1 == b2 ); // false
        System.out.println( b1.getS() == b2.getS() ); // false
        System.out.println( b1.getS().equals( b2.getS() ) ); // true
    }
}

final class A
{
    // static
    public static String s;
    A()
    {
        this.s = new String( "aTest" );
    }
}

final class B
{
    private String s;
    B()
    {
        this.s = new String( "aTest" );
    }

    public String getS()
    {
        return s;
    }

}

You can compare the explanations for "==" (Equality Operator) and ".equals(...)" (method in the java.lang.Object class) through these links:

share|improve this answer

Both == and .equals() refers to the same object if you don't override .equals().

Its your wish what you want to do once you override .equals(). You can compare the invoking object's state with the passed in object's state or you can just call super.equals()

share|improve this answer

Just remember that .equals(...) has to be implemented by the class you are trying to compare. Otherwise, there isn't much of a point; the version of the method for the Object class does the same thing as the comparison operation: Object#equals.

The only time you really want to use the comparison operator for objects is wen you are comparing Enums. This is because there is only one instance of an Enum value at a time. For instance, given the enum

enum FooEnum {A, B, C}

You will never have more than one instance of A at a time, and the same for B and C. This means that you can actually write a method like so:

public boolean compareFoos(FooEnum x, FooEnum y)
{
    return (x == y);
}

And you will have no problems whatsoever.

share|improve this answer

"==" is an operator and "equals" is a method. operators are used for primitive type comparisons and so "==" is used for memory address comparison."equals" method is used for comparing objects.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.