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Eventually I understand this and it works.

bash script:

#!/bin/bash
#$ -V
#$ -cwd
#$ -o $HOME/sge_jobs_output/$JOB_ID.out -j y
#$ -S /bin/bash
#$ -l mem_free=4G


c=$SGE_TASK_ID
cd /home/xxx/scratch/test/
FILENAME=`head -$c testlist|tail -1`
python testpython.py $FILENAME

python script:

#!/bin/python
import sys,os


path='/home/xxx/scratch/test/'
name1=sys.argv[1]
job_id=os.path.join(path+name1)
f=open(job_id,'r').readlines()
print f[1]

thx

share|improve this question
    
What part of the argparse module confuses you? docs.python.org/dev/library/argparse.html. It helps to ask more specific questions on problem you're having with your code. Please post code, using argparse and ask specific questions. –  S.Lott Sep 22 '11 at 20:30
    
Pass it as a command line parameter and then pull it out of sys.argv. –  GreenMatt Sep 22 '11 at 20:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Bash variables are actually environment variables. You get at them through the os.environ object with a dictionary-like interface. Note that there are two types of variables in Bash: those local to the current process, and those that are inherited by child processes. Your Python script is a child process, so you need to make sure that you export the variable you want the child process to access.

To answer your original question, you need to first export the variable and then access it from within the python script using os.environ.

##!/bin/bash
#$ -V
#$ -cwd
#$ -o $HOME/sge_jobs_output/$JOB_ID.out -j y
#$ -S /bin/bash
#$ -l mem_free=4G

c=$SGE_TASK_ID
cd /home/xxx/scratch/test/
export FILENAME=`head -$c testlist|tail -1`
chmod +X testpython.py
./testpython.py


#!/bin/python
import sys
import os

for arg in sys.argv:  
    print arg  

f=open('/home/xxx/scratch/test/' + os.environ['FILENAME'],'r').readlines()
print f[1]

Alternatively, you may pass the variable as a command line argument, which is what your code is doing now. In that case, you must look in sys.argv, which is the list of arguments passed to your script. They appear in sys.argv in the same order you specified them when invoking the script. sys.argv[0] always contains the name of the program that's running. Subsequent entries contain other arguments. len(sys.argv) indicates the number of arguments the script received.

#!/bin/python
import sys
import os

if len(sys.argv) < 2:
    print 'Usage: ' + sys.argv[0] + ' <filename>'
    sys.exit(1)

print 'This is the name of the python script: ' + sys.argv[0]
print 'This is the 1st argument:              ' + sys.argv[1]

f=open('/home/xxx/scratch/test/' + sys.argv[1],'r').readlines()
print f[1]
share|improve this answer

Take a look at parsing Python arguments. Your bash code would be fine, just need to edit your Python script to take the argument.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry still confused...can anyone add sys.argv into the python code? –  wang Sep 22 '11 at 20:50
    
You'll need to add import sys and change the python script to accept the arguments using something like args[1] –  aus Sep 22 '11 at 20:53

Command line arguments to the script are available as sys.argv list.

share|improve this answer

use this inside your script (EDITED per Aarons suggestion):

def main(args):
    do_something(args[0])


if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys
    main(sys.argv[1:])
share|improve this answer
    
bool(sys.argv) is always True and sys.argv[0] will contain the script name. –  wRAR Sep 22 '11 at 20:33
1  
haters gonna hate, corrected –  MattoTodd Sep 22 '11 at 20:35
1  
If you're going to pass the arguments to a function, its more common to cut off the script name so the function doesn't need to know to ignore it. i.e. main(sys.argv[1:]) –  Aaron Dufour Sep 22 '11 at 21:13
    
what is 'do_something'? –  wang Sep 22 '11 at 21:40
    
anything you want it to be, i'm just showing you how you can grab the arguments like your question asks –  MattoTodd Sep 22 '11 at 21:44

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