Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an audit table and instead of defining an identity or ticketed column, I'm considering just pushing in the records of the recorded table (via triggers).

Can a SQL Server 2000 table have no PK, and therefore contain duplicate records?

If yes, does all I have to do consist of CREATING the TABLE without defining any constraint on it?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes a SQL Server 2000 table can have no primary key and contain duplicate records and yes you can simply Create a table without defining any constraint on it. However I would not suggest this.

Instead, since you are creating an audit table for another table. Lets say for this example you have a Person Table and a Person Audit table that tracks changes in the person Table.

Create your Audit Table like this

CREATE TABLE dbo.PersonAuditID
(
  PersonAuditID int NOT NULL IDENTITY (1, 1),
  PersonId int NOT NULL,
  FirstName nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
  LastName nvarchar(50) NOT NULL,
  PersonWhoMadeTheChange nvarchar(100) NOT NULL,
  TimeOfChange datetime NOT NULL,
  ChangeAction int NOT NULL,
  /* any other fields here*/
  CONSTRAINT [PK_PersonAudit] PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED 
  (
[PersonAuditID] ASC
  )
)  ON [PRIMARY]

This will give you a primary key, and keep records unique to the table. It also provides the ability to track who made the change, when the change was made, and if the change was an insert, update or delete.

Your triggers would look like the following

CREATE TRIGGER Insert_PERSON
   ON  PERSON
   AFTER INSERT
AS 
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    INSERT INTO PERSONAUDIT
    (PersonID, 
     FirstName, 
     LastName, 
     PersonWhoMadeTheChange, 
     TimeOfChange, 
     ChangeAction,
     ... other fields here
     SELECT 
       PersonID,
       FirstName,
       LastName,
       User(),
       getDate(),
       1,
       ... other fields here
     FROM INSERTED

END

CREATE TRIGGER Update_PERSON
   ON  PERSON
   AFTER UPDATE
AS 
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    INSERT INTO PERSONAUDIT
    (PersonID, 
     FirstName, 
     LastName, 
     PersonWhoMadeTheChange, 
     TimeOfChange, 
     ChangeAction,
     ... other fields here
     SELECT 
       PersonID,
       FirstName,
       LastName,
       User(),
       getDate(),
       2,
       ... other fields here
     FROM INSERTED

END

CREATE TRIGGER Delete_PERSON
   ON  PERSON
   AFTER DELETE
AS 
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    INSERT INTO PERSONAUDIT
    (PersonID, 
     FirstName, 
     LastName, 
     PersonWhoMadeTheChange, 
     TimeOfChange, 
     ChangeAction,
     ... other fields here
     SELECT 
       PersonID,
       FirstName,
       LastName,
       User(),
       getDate(),
       3,
       ... other fields here
     FROM DELETED

END
share|improve this answer
    
Look like the last bit of your answer is missing –  nykash Sep 22 '11 at 20:39
    
Thanks for your answer. However, I have an 'on edit: insert' trigger where a PK-tuple of the main table can insert PK-identical records into the audit table. –  ppecher Sep 22 '11 at 20:43
    
@ppecher This structure would make it impossible to enter identical records for the PersonAudit Table due to the identity column and Primary key. However, it would allow you to enter Identical Person Table Records into the PersonAudit Table. –  John Hartsock Sep 22 '11 at 20:46
1  
John, you say that the code gives you a primary key, but it does not. An IDENTITY column does not guarantee uniqueness, it only encourages it. I can very easily put duplicates in your table if I wanted to. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 22 '11 at 20:49
    
@ John Hartsock: Okay, I think I follow: You assume that the audit table adds PersonAuditID and ChangeAction and uses the former as part of the PK (so that it is guaranteed to be unique)? –  ppecher Sep 22 '11 at 20:50

Yes, this is possible, but not necessarily a good idea. Replication and efficient indexing will be quite difficult without a primary key.

share|improve this answer

Yes a table without a primary key or Unique Constraint can have rows that are duplicated

for example

CREATE TABLE bla(ID INT)


INSERT bla (ID) VALUES(1)
INSERT bla (ID) VALUES(1)
INSERT bla (ID) VALUES(1)


SELECT * FROM bla
GO
share|improve this answer

SQL Server 2000+, can have tables without PK. And yes, you create them by no using a constraint.

share|improve this answer

For an audit table, you need to think of what you may be using the audit data for. And even if you are not doing auditing to spefically use to restore records when unfortunate changes were made, they are inevitably used for this. Will it be easier to identify the record you want to restore if you have a surrogate key that prevents you from accidentally restoring 30 other entries when you only want the most recent? Will a key value help you identify the 32,578 records that were deleted in one batch that needs to be restored?

What we do for auditing is have two tables for each table, one stores information about the batch of records changed, including an auto-incrementing id, the user, the application, the datetime, the number of affected records. The child table then used the ID as the fk and stored the details about the old and new values for each record inserted/updated/deleted. This really helps us when a process bug causes many records to be changed by accident.

share|improve this answer
    
very good points. thanks –  ppecher Sep 22 '11 at 21:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.