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how to make friend function of std::make_shared().

I tried:

class MyClass{
public:
     friend std::shared_ptr<MyClass> std::make_shared<MyClass>();
     //or
     //friend std::shared_ptr<MyClass> std::make_shared();
protected:
     MyClass();
};

but it does not work (i'am using Visual Studio 2010 SP1)

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And by "doesn't work" we mean...? –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 21:26
    
std::make_shared<T>() invocation cannot access protected member in T –  uray Sep 22 '11 at 21:27
1  
Note that make_shared is a (variadic) template, and in any case, why does it need to be a friend? Is your constructor private? If so, why not use shared_from_this? –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 21:27
1  
possible duplicate of Can I use boost::make_shared with a private constructor? –  Billy ONeal Sep 22 '11 at 21:28
1  
@uray: It isn't. Really, what make_shared is doing has no effect here -- to call the constructor the calling code needs to have access to that code. It's most common with something like make_shared (i.e. a factory method) -- but no implementation can work around this kind of access control and still have well defined behavior. –  Billy ONeal Sep 22 '11 at 21:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

How about adding a static method to your class:

class Foo
{
public:
  static shared_ptr<Foo> create() { return std::shared_ptr<Foo>(new Foo); }
private:
  // ...
};

Here's a little hackaround:

class Foo
{
  struct HideMe { };
  Foo() { };
public:
  explicit Foo(HideMe) { };
  static shared_ptr<Foo> create() { return std::make_shared<Foo>(HideMe());
};

Nobody can use the public constructor other than the class itself. It's essentially a non-interface part of the public interface. Ask the Java people if such a thing has a name :-)

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this is what actually I'am doing, but that std::make_shared<Foo>() can't access my constructor which is in private of Foo –  uray Sep 22 '11 at 21:41
1  
@Griwes: It's more efficient. –  Puppy Sep 22 '11 at 22:07
2  
@uray: I believe you cannot use make_shared in this situation. make_shared has certain requirements, and an accessible constructor seems to be one of them. You could hack around that perhaps by making a public constructor that depends on a private class. Let me edit that. –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 22:07
1  
@Griwes: make_shared creates a version of shared_ptr that only uses one dynamic allocation, as opposed to two for all the other versions. Note that make_shared accepts neither deleter nor allocator arguments; this limitation of flexibility buys you efficiency. –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 22:11
1  
@Kerrek: Well you can use allocate_shared if you want a custom allocator. –  user802003 Sep 23 '11 at 0:48

It doesn't work because the VC10 implementation hands off construction to an internal helper function. You can dig through the source code and friend this function if you want.

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Same with GCC, where you need to befriend std::_Sp_counted_ptr_inplace. –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 22:12

The class who's internal data you want access to is the one that has to declare other classes as friends as it breaks standard encapsulation.

You cant have std::make_shared make your class a friend, and assuming you're not changing std::make_shared, it shouldn't want your class to be a friend.

So, unless I understand the question wrong - what you're asking can't be done.

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If you are okay with delving into the internal implementation details of the compiler that you are using, for VC10/Visual C++ 2010, as @DeadMG mentioned, you can befriend the internal implementation. You'll want to befriend std::tr1::_Ref_count_obj<T>.

I've tested this with Microsoft (R) C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.40219.01 for x64

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