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Streaming xml-parsers like SAX and StAX are faster and more memory efficient than parsers building a tree-structure like DOM-parsers. SAX is a push parser, meaning that it's an instance of the observer pattern (also called listener pattern). SAX was there first, but then came StAX - a pull parser, meaning that it basically works like an iterator pattern.

You can find reasons why to prefer StAX over SAX everywhere, but it usually boils down to: "it's easier to use".

In the Java tutorial on JAXP StAX is vaguely presented as the middle between DOM and SAX: "it's easier than SAX and more efficient than DOM". However, I never found any clues that StAX would be slower or less memory efficient than SAX.

All this made me wonder: are there any reasons to choose SAX instead of StAX?

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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

To generalize a bit, I think StAX can be as efficient as SAX. With the improved design of StAX I can't really find any situation where SAX parsing would be preferred, unless working with legacy code.

EDIT: According to this blog Java SAX vs. StAX StAXoffer no schema validation.

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it's not too hard to add validation on top of stax. implemented that myself the other day. –  jtahlborn Sep 23 '11 at 2:38
    
More detail on validation: stackoverflow.com/questions/5793087/stax-xml-validation –  Steve Jan 20 at 19:56
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Overview
XML documents are hierarchical documents, where the same element names and namespaces might occur in several places, having different meaning, and in infinitive depth (recursive). As normal, the solution to big problems, is to divide them into small problems. In the context of XML parsing, this means parsing specific parts of XML in methods specific to that XML. For example, one piece of logic would parse an address:

<Address>
    <Street>Odins vei</Street>    
    <Buildning>4</Buildning>
    <Door>b</Door>
</Address>

i.e. you would have a method

AddressType parseAddress(...); // A

or

void parseAddress(...); // B

somewhere in your logic, taking XML inputs arguments and returning an object (result of B can be fetched from a field later).

SAX
SAX 'pushes' XML events, leaving it up to you to determine where the XML events belong in your program / data.

// method in stock SAX handler
public void startElement(String uri, String localName, String qName, Attributes attributes) throws SAXException
    // .. your logic here for start element
}

In case of an 'Buildning' start element, you would need to determine that you are actually parsing an Address and then route the XML event to the method whose job it is to interpret Address.

StAX
StAX 'pulls' XML events, leaving it up to you to determine where in your program / data to receive the XML events.

// method in standard StAX reader
int event = reader.next();
if(event == XMLStreamConstants.START_ELEMENT) {
    // .. your logic here for start element
}

Of course, you would always want to receive a 'Buildning' event in in the method whose job it is to interpret Address.

Discussion
The difference between SAX and StAX is that of push and pull. In both cases, the parse state must be handled somehow.

This translates to method B as typical for SAX, and method A for StAX. In addition, SAX must give B individual XML events, while StAX can give A multiple events (by passing an XMLStreamReader instance).

Thus B first check the previous state of the parsing and then handle each individual XML event and then store the state (in a field). Method A can just handle the XML events all at once by accessing the XMLStreamReader multiple times until satisfied.

Conclusion
StAX lets you structure your parsing (data-binding) code according to the XML structure; so in relation to SAX, the 'state' is implicit from the program flow for StAX, whereas in SAX, you always need to preserve some kind of state variable + route the flow according to that state, for most event calls.

I recommend StAX for all but the simplest documents. Rather move to SAX as an optimization later (but you'll probably want to go binary by then).

Follow this pattern when parsing using StAX:

public MyDataBindingObject parse(..) { // provide input stream, reader, etc

        // set up parser
        // read the root tag to get to level 1
        XMLStreamReader reader = ....;

        do {
            int event = reader.next();
            if(event == XMLStreamConstants.START_ELEMENT) {
              // check if correct root tag
              break;
            }

            // add check for document end if you want to

        } while(reader.hasNext());

        MyDataBindingObject object = new MyDataBindingObject();
        // read root attributes if any

        int level = 1; // we are at level 1, since we have read the document header

        do {
            int event = reader.next();
            if(event == XMLStreamConstants.START_ELEMENT) {
                level++;
                // do stateful stuff here

                // for child logic:
                if(reader.getLocalName().equals("Whatever1")) {
                    WhateverObject child = parseSubTreeForWhatever(reader);
                    level --; // read from level 1 to 0 in submethod.

                    // do something with the result of subtree
                    object.setWhatever(child);
                }

                // alternatively, faster
                if(level == 2) {
                    parseSubTreeForWhateverAtRelativeLevel2(reader);
                    level --; // read from level 1 to 0 in submethod.

                    // do something with the result of subtree
                    object.setWhatever(child);
                }


            } else if(event == XMLStreamConstants.END_ELEMENT) {
                level--;
                // do stateful stuff here, too
            }

        } while(level > 0);

        return object;
}

So the submethod uses about the same approach, i.e. counting level:

private MySubTreeObject parseSubTree(XMLStreamReader reader) throws XMLStreamException {

    MySubTreeObject object = new MySubTreeObject();
    // read element attributes if any

    int level = 1;
    do {
        int event = reader.next();
        if(event == XMLStreamConstants.START_ELEMENT) {
            level++;
            // do stateful stuff here

            // for child logic:
            if(reader.getLocalName().equals("Whatever2")) {
                MyWhateverObject child = parseMySubelementTree(reader);
                level --; // read from level 1 to 0 in submethod.

                // use subtree object somehow
                object.setWhatever(child);
            }

            // alternatively, faster, but less strict
            if(level == 2) {
              MyWhateverObject child = parseMySubelementTree(reader);
                level --; // read from level 1 to 0 in submethod.

                // use subtree object somehow
                object.setWhatever(child);
            }


        } else if(event == XMLStreamConstants.END_ELEMENT) {
            level--;
            // do stateful stuff here, too
        }

    } while(level > 0);

    return object;
}

And then eventually you reach a level in which you will read the base types.

private MySetterGetterObject parseSubTree(XMLStreamReader reader) throws XMLStreamException {

    MySetterGetterObject object = new MySetterGetterObject();
    // read element attributes if any

    int level = 1;
    do {
        int event = reader.next();
        if(event == XMLStreamConstants.START_ELEMENT) {
            level++;

            // assume <FirstName>Thomas</FirstName>:
            if(reader.getLocalName().equals("FirstName")) {
               // read tag contents
               String text = reader.getElementText()
               if(text.length() > 0) {
                    object.setName(reader.getElementText())
               }
               level--;

            } else if(reader.getLocalName().equals("LastName")) {
               // etc ..
            } 


        } else if(event == XMLStreamConstants.END_ELEMENT) {
            level--;
            // do stateful stuff here, too
        }

    } while(level > 0);

    return object;
}

This is quite straightforward and there is no room for misunderstandings. Just remember to decrement level correctly:

A. after you expected characters but got an END_ELEMENT in some tag which should contain chars (in the above pattern):

<Name>Thomas</Name>

was instead

<Name><Name>

The same is true for a missing subtree too, you get the idea.

B. after calling subparsing methods, which are called on start elements, and returns AFTER the corresponding end element, i.e. the parser is at one level lower than before the method call (the above pattern).

Note how this approach totally ignores 'ignorable' whitespace too, for more robust implementation.

Edit: Added overview, added example, added return type in pattern example. Added more robust handling of text.

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In your opening statement it reads "...whereas in SAX...". Is this a typo? ("SAX" instead of "StAX") In any case thanks for the answer. If I understand you correctly, you're saying that the implicit state in the SAX approach is a benefit compared to the need for tracking your xml-tree location in the StAX approach. –  Rinke Sep 23 '11 at 8:20
    
See edit. In other words no typo ;) –  ThomasRS Sep 26 '11 at 15:01
    
Thanks for the (now even more elaborate) answer. I'm afraid I still don't see what would be a good reason for using SAX instead of StAX. Your answer is a good explanation of how both processors work. –  Rinke Sep 27 '11 at 7:53
    
For simple documents, they are the same. Look at for example this schema: mpeg.chiariglione.org/technologies/mpeg-21/mp21-did/index.htm and StAX will be more practical. –  ThomasRS Sep 27 '11 at 22:40
    
In a nutshell, since you are already writing your code, you understand what part of the document you are parsing, i.e. all logic to map a SAX event to is correct code, is wasted. –  ThomasRS Sep 27 '11 at 22:43
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@Rinke: I guess only time I think of preferring SAX over STAX in case when you don't need to handle/process XML content; for e.g. only thing you want to do is check for well-formedness of incoming XML and just want to handle errors if it has...in this case you can simply call parse() method on SAX parser and specify error handler to handle any parsing problem....so basically STAX is definitely preferrable choice in scenarios where you want to handle content becasue SAX content handler is too difficult to code...

one practical example of this case may be if you have series of SOAP nodes in your enterprise system and an entry level SOAP node only lets those SOAP XML pass thru next stage which are well-formedness, then I don't see any reason why I would use STAX. I would just use SAX.

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I selected this answer as the best one so far. Although it's a good answer, I don't feel it's 100% authorative and clear however. New answers are welcome. –  Rinke Nov 29 '11 at 16:00
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It's all a balance.

You can turn a SAX parser into a pull parser using a blocking queue and some thread trickery so, to me, there is much less difference than there first seems.

I believe currently StAX needs to be packaged through a third-party jar while SAX comes free in javax.

I recently chose SAX and built a pull parser around it so I did not need to rely on a third-party jar.

Future versions of Java will almost certainly contain a StAX implementation so the problem goes away.

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