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I'm trying to make a implicit lambda convertible to lambda function by the following code:

#include <boost/function.hpp>

struct Bla {
};

struct Foo {

boost::function< void(Bla& )> f;

  template <typename FnType>
  Foo( FnType fn) : f(fn) {}

};

#include <iostream>

int main() {

Bla bla;
Foo f( [](Bla& v) -> { std::cout << " inside lambda " << std::endl; } );
};

However, i'm getting this error with g++

$ g++ --version
g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.4.4-14ubuntu5) 4.4.5
$ g++ -std=c++0x test.cpp `pkg-config --cflags boost-1.46` -o xtest `pkg-config --libs boost-1.46` 
test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:21: error: expected primary-expression before ‘[’ token
test.cpp:21: error: expected primary-expression before ‘]’ token
test.cpp:21: error: expected primary-expression before ‘&’ token
test.cpp:21: error: ‘v’ was not declared in this scope
test.cpp:21: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘{’ token

any idea how can i achieve the above? or if i can achieve it at all?


UPDATE trying with g++ 4.5

$ g++-4.5 --version
g++-4.5 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.5.1-7ubuntu2) 4.5.1
$ g++-4.5 -std=c++0x test.cpp `pkg-config --cflags boost-1.46` -o xtest `pkg-config --libs boost-1.46` 
test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:20:22: error: expected type-specifier before ‘{’ token
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2  
Does your compiler support lambdas at all? I thought GCC only supported it from 4.5 onward. –  Kerrek SB Sep 22 '11 at 21:42
3  
Why use boost::function instead of std::function? –  UncleBens Sep 22 '11 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are missing a void:

Foo f( [](Bla& v) -> void { std::cout << " inside lambda " << std::endl; } );
//                   ^ here

Or, as @ildjarn pointed out, you can simply omit the return type:

Foo f( [](Bla& v) { std::cout << " inside lambda " << std::endl; } );

With either of these lines, your code compiles fine using MinGW g++ 4.5.2 and Boost v1.46.1.

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4  
Alternately, the lambda return type could be left unspecified. I.e., he just needs to remove ->. –  ildjarn Sep 22 '11 at 21:47

Your lambda syntax is wrong. you have the '->' in there but don't specify the return type. You probably mean:

Foo f( [](Bla& v) { std::cout << " inside lambda " << std::endl; } );
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