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Is the following safe? I know, strictly speaking, dereferencing a pointer before the thing to which it points has been properly constructed seems dangerous, but I imagine the compiler will just provide a pointer without actually doing any dereferencing. Well, I assume.

(Note: gInst doesn't actually use the reference until much later.)

TU 1

Sys::System::System::System(const sf::VideoMode& rVM, const std::string& rSTR, unsigned long settings) :
    win(rVM, rSTR, settings),
    gInst(*this)
{

}

Header A

namespace Sys
{
    namespace System
    {
        struct System;
    }

    namespace UI
    {
        struct GUI
        {
            System::System& topl;
            MenuBar menu;

            GUI(System::System&);

            private:

            GUI();
            GUI(const GUI&);
            GUI& operator=(const GUI&);
        };
    }
}

Header B

namespace Sys
{
    namespace System
    {
        struct System
        {
            sf::RenderWindow win;
            Sys::UI::GUI gInst;
            Sys::Editor::Editor eInst;

            System(const sf::VideoMode&, const std::string&, unsigned long);

            private:

            System();
            System(const System&);
            System& operator=(const System&);
        };

        void start();
    }
}
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It depends on gInst function that you haven't shown here. If it only stores the pointer/reference and doesn't use it if ctor throws then you're fine. –  Gene Bushuyev Sep 22 '11 at 22:38
    
If ctor throws, then gInst's destructor gets called, right? Implies that gInst's destructor better not assume that the System object it was passed is any good. –  Mike DeSimone Sep 22 '11 at 22:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

(Note: gInst doesn't actually use the reference until much later.)

Then it's completely safe. (Taking note you say "the reference", not "the value".)

Compilers will just warn about it for the reason you've stated, but there's nothing undefined about it, just "risky". Note that you can often trump compiler warnings (if they bother you) with something like this:

struct foo
{
    foo() : b(self())
    {}

private:
    foo& self() { return *this; }

    bar b;
};
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The short answer: Maybe, if you're careful.

The long answer: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.7

Relating to your specific issue: That's fine, as long as gInst really is a reference.

(a class called System in the namespace System in the namespace Sys? o.O)

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As long as gInst never accesses a data member or member function of gInst or attempts to perform run-time type introspection via RTTI or dynamic_cast, until after the constructor has completed, then it is safe.

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How is gInst declared? if it takes a reference and stores it as reference(Sys::System::System &)/pointer(Sys::System::System *) its safe. If it takes a raw class (Sys::System::System) or stores it as a raw class, it will not be safe as it will copy it.

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