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A few related questions here.

As per the title, why is it a requirement if we are specifying the variable type as long or float, double? Doesn't the compiler evaluate a variables type at compile time?

Java considers all integral literals as int - is this to lessen the blow of inadvertent memory waste? And all floating-point literals as double - to ensure highest precision?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This becomes important when you do more than a simple assignment. If you take

float x = 0.1 * 3.0;

it makes a difference if the computer does the multiplication in double precision and then converts to single precision or if it converts the numbers to single precision first and then multiplies.

edit: Not in this explicit case 0.1 and 3.0, but if your numbers become complex enough, you will run into precision issues that show differences between float and double. Making it explicit to the compiler if they are supposed to be doubles or float avoids ambiguity.

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actually, the above won't compile; you can't enforce an implicit narrowing conversion on a double to a float - this you must do explicitly. Although, you are right in saying that the L, f, d identifiers are important when it comes to performing math. I just don't understand why (unless my assumptions in the question are correct) it was decided that java treats integer literals as int and floating-point literals as double. –  wulfgar.pro Sep 24 '11 at 6:44
    
I guess I was getting confused as to how Java handled literals - after reading some more I now understand that Java simply interprets (evaluates) the value of a literal - there is no storage of the literal in memory unless it is assigned to a variable. As others have mentioned, the identifiers are really just ways of distinguishing between values that look the same, such that the correct (desired) result is achieved. –  wulfgar.pro Sep 24 '11 at 8:59

When you have a constant there are subtle differences between value which look the same, but are not. Additionally, since autoboxing was introduce, you get a very different result as less.

Consider what you get if you multiply 0.1 by 0.1 as a float or as a double and convert to a float.

float a = (float) (0.1 * 0.1);
float b = 0.1f * 0.1f;
System.out.println("a= "+new BigDecimal(a));
System.out.println("b= "+new BigDecimal(b));
System.out.println("a == b is " + (a == b));

prints

a= 0.00999999977648258209228515625
b= 0.010000000707805156707763671875
a == b is false

Now compare what you get if you use either float or int to perform a calculation.

float a = 33333333f - 11111111f;
float b = 33333333 - 11111111;
System.out.println("a= "+new BigDecimal(a));
System.out.println("b= "+new BigDecimal(b));
System.out.println("a == b is " + (a == b));

prints

a= 22222220
b= 22222222
a == b is false

Compare int and long

long a = 33333333 * 11111111; // overflows
long b = 33333333L * 11111111L;
System.out.println("a= "+new BigDecimal(a));
System.out.println("b= "+new BigDecimal(b));
System.out.println("a == b is " + (a == b));

prints

a= -1846840301
b= 370370362962963
a == b is false

compare double with long

double a = 333333333333333333L  / 333333333L;
double b = 333333333333333333D  / 333333333D;
System.out.println("a= "+new BigDecimal(a));
System.out.println("b= "+new BigDecimal(b));
System.out.println("a == b is " + (a == b));

prints

a= 1000000001
b= 1000000000.99999988079071044921875
a == b is false

In summary its possible to construct a situation where using int, long, double or float will produce a different result compared with using another type.

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I believe it's simply to avoid confusion. How will the compiler know that 1.5 is meant to be a float or double if there's no default for it to fall back on? As for evaluating variables, please note that variables != literals.

Edit 1
Regarding some comments, I believe that there are times when you wouldn't want the compiler to automatically translate the literal on the right to variable type on the left.

Edit 2
And of course there's

public void foo(int bar) {
  //...
}

public void foo(long bar) {
  //...
}

   //... some other method
   foo(20);  // which foo is called?
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1  
sure if you pass the literal as opposed to a typed variable, i.e. sum(1L, 2L); - but why if I'm defining the variable with a type, i.e. long a = 1(?L); long b = 2(?L); sum(a,b);? –  wulfgar.pro Sep 23 '11 at 0:11
    
In a perfect world, wouldn't the compiler just be able to figure it out based on what the type should be? Of course, this might not be feasible given Java's design, but I don't think it's impossible in general. –  Tikhon Jelvis Sep 23 '11 at 0:11
    
I don't know why they call the grammar "context free", but at least it coincide with the general principle that the meaning of an expression is self evident, not dependent on its context. –  irreputable Sep 23 '11 at 0:19
1  
It makes sense if you're thinking of literals in the context of literals. Although, more often than not, I find myself wanting the literal to be the type defined for the variable - it seems redundant to have to specify it in that case. –  wulfgar.pro Sep 23 '11 at 0:50
    
@wulfgar.pro designing a programming language close to the intuition of programmers would be very nice; but also very difficult. a feature request seems very simple on its own; but adding it to the spec which already is 700 pages long without breaking anything is not an easy task. –  irreputable Sep 23 '11 at 2:44

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