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I am dabbling in Powershell and completely new to .NET.

I am running a PS script that starts with an empty hash table. The hash table will grow to at least 15,000 to 20,000 entries. Keys of the hash table will be email addresses in string form, and values will be booleans. (I simply need to track whether or not I've seen an email address.)

So far, I've been growing the hash table one entry at a time. I check to make sure the key-value pair doesn't already exist (PS will error on this condition), then I add the pair.

Here's the portion of my code we're talking about:

...
    if ($ALL_AD_CONTACTS[$emailString] -ne $true) {
      $ALL_AD_CONTACTS += @{$emailString = $true}
    }
...

I am wondering if there is anything one can do from a PowerShell or .NET standpoint that will optimize the performance of this hash table if you KNOW it's going to be huge ahead of time, like 15,000 to 20,000 entries or beyond.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
is a hash table the correct structure? basically if it's in the hash table it's value is true, no? – kenny Sep 23 '11 at 1:05
    
Correct. The key is the email address and the value is simply $true. What's a more efficient way of remembering 15,000 email addresses, for the purposes of determining if an arbitrary email address is in that set? I figured a hash table was constant time lookup as opposed to an array. – Larold Sep 23 '11 at 1:30
    
I'm not familiar enough with what's available in PowerShell. In .NET I would choose a List<T> without measuring the performance. A hash takes time to create on lookup/insert and you also don't need to store the 'value', so that's unneeded operations. I don't know the O-factor of the List<> off-hand, but if performance is crucial I would measure it. – kenny Sep 23 '11 at 10:29

I performed some basic tests using Measure-Command, using a set of 20 000 random words.

The individual results are shown below, but in summary it appears that adding to one hashtable by first allocating a new hashtable with a single entry is incredibly inefficient :) Although there were some minor efficiency gains among options 2 through 5, in general they all performed about the same.

If I were to choose, I might lean toward option 5 for its simplicity (just a single Add call per string), but all the alternatives I tested seem viable.

$chars = [char[]]('a'[0]..'z'[0])
$words = 1..20KB | foreach {
  $count = Get-Random -Minimum 15 -Maximum 35
  -join (Get-Random $chars -Count $count)
}

# 1) Original, adding to hashtable with "+=".
#     TotalSeconds: ~800
Measure-Command {
  $h = @{}
  $words | foreach { if( $h[$_] -ne $true ) { $h += @{ $_ = $true } } }
}

# 2) Using sharding among sixteen hashtables.
#     TotalSeconds: ~3
Measure-Command {
  [hashtable[]]$hs = 1..16 | foreach { @{} }
  $words | foreach {
    $h = $hs[$_.GetHashCode() % 16]
    if( -not $h.ContainsKey( $_ ) ) { $h.Add( $_, $null ) }
  }
}

# 3) Using ContainsKey and Add on a single hashtable.
#     TotalSeconds: ~3
Measure-Command {
  $h = @{}
  $words | foreach { if( -not $h.ContainsKey( $_ ) ) { $h.Add( $_, $null ) } }
}

# 4) Using ContainsKey and Add on a hashtable constructed with capacity.
#     TotalSeconds: ~3
Measure-Command {
  $h = New-Object Collections.Hashtable( 21KB )
  $words | foreach { if( -not $h.ContainsKey( $_ ) ) { $h.Add( $_, $null ) } }
}

# 5) Using HashSet<string> and Add.
#     TotalSeconds: ~3
Measure-Command {
  $h = New-Object Collections.Generic.HashSet[string]
  $words | foreach { $null = $h.Add( $_ ) }
}
share|improve this answer

You're going to spend a lot of the CPU time re-allocating the internal 'arrays' in the Hashtable. Have you tried the .NET constructor for Hashtable that takes a capacity?

$t = New-Object Hashtable 20000
...
if (!($t.ContainsKey($emailString))) { 
    $t.Add($emailString, $emailString) 
}

My version uses the same $emailString for the key & value, no .NET boxing of $true to an [object] just as a placeholder. The non-null string will evaluate to $true in PowerShell 'if' conditionals, so other code where you check shouldn't change. Your use of '+= @{...}' would be a big no-no in performance sensitive .NET code. You might be allocating a new Hashtable per email just by using the '@{}' syntax, which could be wasting a lot of time.

Your approach of breaking up the very large collection into a (relatively small) number of smaller collections is called 'sharding'. You should use the Hashtable constructor that takes a capacity even if you're sharding by 16.

Also, @Larold is right, if you're not looking up the email addresses, then use 'New-Object ArrayList 20000' to create a pre-allocated list.

Also, the collections grow expenentially (factor of 1.5 or 2 on each 'growth'). The effect of this is that you should be able to reduce how much you pre-allocate by an order of manitude, and if the collections resize once or twice per 'data load' you probably won't notice. I would bet it is the first 10-20 generations of 'growth' that is taking time.

share|improve this answer

So it's a few weeks later, and I wasn't able to come up with the perfect solution. A friend at Google suggested splitting the hash into several smaller hashes. He suggested that each time I went to look up a key, I'd have several misses until I found the right "bucket", but he said the read penalty wouldn't be nearly as bad as the write penalty when the collision algorithm ran to insert entries into the (already giant) hash table.

I took this idea and took it one step further. I split the hash into 16 smaller buckets. When inserting an email address as a key into the data structures, I actually first compute a hash on the email address itself, and do a mod 16 operation to get a consistent value between 0 and 15. I then use that calculated value as the "bucket" number.

So instead of using one giant hash, I actually have a 16-element array, whose elements are hash tables of email addresses.

The total speed it takes to build the in-memory representation of my "master list" of 20,000+ email addresses, using split-up hash table buckets, is now roughly 1,000% faster. (10 times faster).

Accessing all of the data in the hashes has no noticeable speed delays. This is the best solution I've been able to come up with so far. It's slightly ugly, but the performance improvement speaks for itself.

share|improve this answer

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