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Env: VS 2008, C++

I have code like below:

void HopeException(LPVOID nVerify) 
{   
     char *p = NULL; 
     p = (char *)nVerify;  
     delete []p; 
}

When I invoke the function "HopeException" with parameter not-NULL, like:

    HopeException(123);

then I hope the program will throw an exception.

But when I compile the code on VS 2008 with Release mode, the program runs well.

I don't know why. Could anyone give me a help about this issue?

Or do you have any good idea to implement the feature with another method?

Edit:

I am so sorry, I think I posted the wrong code before.

Actually, I am doing protection for my software. My software will get the CRC value of DLL file, and then my software will check the CRC value like below:

    unsigned int VerifyCRC = FF234322;
    unsinged int CRC = getCRC("Fun.dll");
    LPVOID lpResult = CRC & (~VerifyCRC);
    HopeException(lpResult);

So according the code below, if the cracker cracks the Fun.dll file, the execute will throw out an exception.
That is really I want.

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3  
That code shouldn't even compile! –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '11 at 1:59
1  
Deleting non-new allocated data is undefined, so whatever happens is up to the implementation. Looks like you're just surviving without it exploding in your face. However, what exactly are you trying to do? –  birryree Sep 23 '11 at 1:59
    
I don't know what you are trying to do or achieve with that code, but what I do know is that you are exhibiting undefined behavior. –  Marlon Sep 23 '11 at 2:01
    
@Marlon Actually not necessarily. Storing a pointer in a primitive should be valid c++ (though using an int for this isn't especially intelligent and may backfire, but oh well) –  Voo Sep 23 '11 at 2:48
    
@jell I added your correction/clarification from Ansons answer to your question. –  Mark Hall Sep 23 '11 at 3:07

3 Answers 3

Jell - C++ gives you enough rope to hang yourself (and most probably most of you friends).

But why do it? (- Suppose it depends on your friends).

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If I were OP, this would be the accepted answer. –  Anson Sep 23 '11 at 2:06

You're treating nVerify as an address and assigning it to your pointer p, and then invoking delete[] on that address. If the value of nVerify isn't a valid address you can get undefined behavior, which includes the program appearing to "run well" mostly because you're not really doing much in this function.

What are you really trying to do?

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I am so sorry, I think I post the wrong code, the right code below: void HopeException(LPVOID nVerify) { char *p = NULL; p = (char *)nVerify; delete []p; } –  jell Sep 23 '11 at 2:29

That code shouldn't compile in C++; the closest thing that should compile fine is:

void HopeException(int nVerify)
{
      char *p = NULL;
      p = (char *)nVerify;
      delete []p;
}

This code will crash on VS 2010 Express, so I assume it will also crash in VS 2008. If your goal is to throw a debugger exception directly (on x86) you can just use

__asm int 3;

If your goal is to break into the debugger you can also just use

DebugBreak();
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I am doing a prontection for my software. My software will get the CRC value of DLL file. and then my software will check the CRC value like below: unsigned int VerifyCRC = FF234322; unsinged int CRC = getCRC("Fun.dll"); LPVOID lpResult = CRC & (~VerifyCRC); HopeException(lpResult); So according the code below, if the cracker crack the Fun.dll file, the execute will throw out an exception. That is really I want. –  jell Sep 23 '11 at 2:29

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