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Get a number from the user (n) and create an n x n box of "X"es on the screen. Without using loops yet. e.g. If they entered 12:

XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXX

The point of this assignment is to use string manipulation to create this box. I can do it with a loop but I'm not sure how to do it with just strings. Can anyone help me out?

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1  
is this homework? –  justintime Sep 23 '11 at 2:42
    
yea it was and I got the answer from my super-genious friend. Let's just say he re-made Mario and Pokemon in pygame just for fun. –  Austin Sep 23 '11 at 3:29

3 Answers 3

You can "multiply" strings. For example, 'x' * 3 gives you xxx. So:

size = int(input())  # convert whatever you have to int
print(size * (size * 'X' + '\n'))  # print the whole thing

This isn't very intuitive (very few languages will let you do that), but getting the input should be straightforward enough.

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On the contrary, I find it extremely intuitive... –  Matt Ball Sep 23 '11 at 2:45
    
@MattBall I guess it depends on your background. As I said, very few languages will let you do that (the only other one I know is Ruby) –  NullUserException Sep 23 '11 at 2:47
    
Yea I know I can multiply strings, the thing I was having trouble with is the new line. I kept getting an error message. Thanks for the help! –  Austin Sep 23 '11 at 3:30
    
You want to call input, and in 2.x it's raw_input. What was the difficulty with the newline BTW? (In the future, consider asking your question more specifically about the part that caused a problem for you.) –  Karl Knechtel Sep 23 '11 at 3:34
    
this is my third week with python... third week coding period actually. I was missing something to do with the new line and I got an error message saying "unexpected character after line continuation" –  Austin Sep 23 '11 at 3:46

You could also use join:

print('\n'.join(['X'*12]*12))
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Thanks, I never knew I could do that... –  Austin Sep 23 '11 at 3:33

I would do:

size = int(raw_input())
print ('X' * size + '\n') * size,

In 3.x, that would be

size = int(input())
print(('X' * size + '\n') * size, end='')
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