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Being impressed by Guava's computing map feature, I'm searching for a sort of "computing reference" - a lazy loading reference implementation that parallel's Guava's ease of use, by which I mean it handles all locking, loading, and exception handling under the hood, only exposing a get() method.

After a brief search turned up nothing, I quickly rolled my own as a proof of concept:

public abstract class ComputingRef<T> implements Callable<T> {

   private volatile T referent = null;
   private Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();

   public T get() {
      T temp = referent;
      if (temp == null) {
         lock.lock();
         try {
            temp = referent;
            if (temp == null) {
               try {
                  referent = temp = call();
               }
               catch (Exception e) {
                  if (e instanceof RuntimeException) {
                     throw (RuntimeException)e;
                  }
                  else {
                     throw new RuntimeException(e);
                  }
               }
            }
         }
         finally {
            lock.unlock();
         }
      }
      return temp;
   }
}

This ComputingRef could be anonymously extended to implement call(), which functions as the factory method:

ComputingRef<MyObject> lazySingletonRef = new ComputingRef<MyObject>() {
   @Override
   public MyObject call() {
      //fetch MyObject from database and return
   }
};

I'm not satisfied that this implementation is optimal, but it demonstrates what I'm after.

I later found this example from the T2 Framework, which appears to be more complex.

Now my questions are:

  • How can my above code be improved?
  • How does it compare to the T2 example, and what advantages are offered by that example's greater complexity?
  • Are there other implementations of a lazy loading reference that I've missed in my search?

EDIT: Updated my implementation to use a local variable as suggested by @irreputable's answer - please upvote it if you find the above example useful.

share|improve this question
    
If you're on Java 5 & up, why not just use an AtomicReference? –  AlistairIsrael Sep 23 '11 at 5:06
1  
@AlistairIsrael - I may be mistaken, but AtomicReference doesn't seem to support lazy loading on its own. –  Paul Bellora Sep 23 '11 at 5:11
    
@AlistairIsrael - Or did you mean I should use it instead of volatile in my code example? –  Paul Bellora Sep 23 '11 at 5:12
    
Yup, have your ComputingMap use an internal AtomicReference instead of having a lock and implementing double-checked locking yourself. –  AlistairIsrael Sep 23 '11 at 7:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

See Suppliers.memoize(Supplier) to lazily initialize a value.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Ah, completely missed this. I notice MemoizingSupplier uses a volatile boolean initialized rather than having the value volatile and checking it for null. How does this compare to the typical double check locking idiom? –  Paul Bellora Sep 23 '11 at 14:13
    
Pretty much the same, but a supplier may return null so it can't be used to indicate initialization. –  Ben Manes Sep 23 '11 at 16:34
    
Understood, thanks! –  Paul Bellora Sep 23 '11 at 16:38

Anyway, here's how I would do it (and then I'd worry about performance later):

public abstract class ComputingRef<T> implements Callable<T> {

    private final AtomicReference<T> ref = new AtomicReference<T>();

    public T get() {
        if (ref.get() == null) {
            try {
                final T newValue = call();
                if (ref.compareAndSet(null, newValue)) {
                    return newValue;
                }
            } catch (final Exception e) {
                if (e instanceof RuntimeException) {
                    throw (RuntimeException) e;
                } else {
                    throw new RuntimeException(e);
                }
            }

        }
        return ref.get();
    }
}

The only 'snag' with this approach is that there is a race condition that could result multiple instantiations of the referent object (esp. if the ComputingRef is shared across a large number of threads that all hit get() at the same time). If instantiating the referent class is so expensive or you want to avoid multiple-instantiation at all costs, then I'd go with your double-checked locking as well.

You also have to make sure that the referent object cleans up after itself. Otherwise, if the compareAndSet() fails, then make sure to perform any necessary cleanup.

(Note that if the referent needs to be a singleton, then I'd use the initialization on demand holder idiom instead.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 the IoDH idiom was worth mentioning. Thanks! –  Paul Bellora Sep 24 '11 at 22:21

It's the good old double-checked locking idiom. You should add a local variable for performance. In your impl, you have 2 volatile reads in the fast path (when referent is set). Check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-checked_locking

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Excellent article, thank you. I'll update my question and cite your answer. –  Paul Bellora Sep 23 '11 at 5:27

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