Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When using RSpec to test deeply nested data structures, I find the need to define subjects in nested contexts in terms of the subjects in the containing contexts. I have looked extensively but not found any examples on how to do with without defining many variables. It complicates the specs and limits the possibility of spec reuse. I am curious whether there is a way to do this in RSpec as it stands and, if not, what would be a good way to approach the problem.

Right now, my code looks something like:

context 'with a result which is a Hash' do
  before do
    @result = get_result()
  end
  subject { @result }
  it { should be_a Hash }
  context 'with an Array' do
    before do
      @array_elem = @result[special_key]
    end
    subject { @array_elem }
    it { should be_an Array }
    context 'that contains a Hash' do
      before do
        @nested_hash = ...
      end
      subject { @nested_hash }
      ...
    end
  end
end

Instead, I'd rather write something along the lines of:

context 'with a result which is a Hash' do
  subject { get_result }
  it { should be_a Hash }
  context 'with an Array' do
    subject { parent_subject[special_key] }
    it { should be_an Array }
    context 'that contains a Hash' do
      subject { do_something_with(parent_subject) }
      ...
    end
  end
end

What's a way to extend RSpec with this type of automatic subject hierarchy management?

share|improve this question
1  
That is a really good question. I quite disagree with the answers; your example in the question, quite clearly illustrates that such featuer would clean up the specs. Did you find a good way of achieving this? – Jarl Sep 6 '12 at 11:00
    
@Jarl I did not build a good solution for this exact problem but I came up with useful pattern for testing evolving data structures, which I've sometimes used around the types of problems described here. Here is the code: gist.github.com/3662530 To use it, just drop it in spec/support. – Sim Sep 7 '12 at 1:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In this type of hierarchic structure, I would actually drop the use of subject and make the subject explicit. While this could result in a bit more typing (if you have a lot of tests), it is also clearer. The nested subject-statements could also be confusing what is actually being tested if you are three levels down.

  context 'with a result which is a Hash' do
    before do
      @result = get_result()
    end
    it { @result.should be_a Hash }
    context 'special_key' do
      before do
        @array_elem = @result[special_key]
      end
      it { @array_elem.should be_an Array }
      context 'that contains a Hash' do
        before do
          @nested_hash = ...
        end
        it { @nested_hash.should be_a Hash }
        ...
      end
    end
  end

But this could be a matter of taste. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I decided to go this route in the end. – Sim Oct 23 '11 at 23:33
1  
You can also use specify instead of it for better readability, e.g. specify { @result.should be_a Hash } – Valentin Nemcev Apr 19 '12 at 12:18
2  
or use a named subject like subject(:name) { @result[special_key] } – Max Schulze Jan 25 '14 at 10:12
    
The "named subject" is not a rspec feature, but it can make the code a little more readable (subject does not take a parameter, see code). In general, I tend to avoid let and subject because, unless in very trivial cases, it makes my tests harder to understand. Most of the times I need to jump into a failing test and fix that, and it is easier to understand if everything is more explicit. This answer expresses it better :) – nathanvda Jan 25 '14 at 12:47

I was looking for the same kind of thing, and wanted to use subject so that I could use its, so I implemented it like this:

describe "#results" do
  let(:results) { Class.results }

  context "at the top level" do
    subject { results }

    it { should be_a Hash }
    its(['featuredDate']) { should == expected_date }
    its(['childItems']) { should be_a Array }
  end

  context "the first child item" do
    subject { results['childItems'][0] }

    it { should be_a Hash }
    its(['title']) { should == 'Title' }
    its(['body']) { should == 'Body' }
  end

  context "the programme info for the first child item" do
    subject { results['childItems'][0]['programme'] }

    it { should be_a Hash }
    its(['title']) { should == 'title' }
    its(['description']) { should == 'description' }
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This is nice, this should be the accepted answer. – nathanvda Jan 25 '14 at 12:40
    
its is removed since rspec 3. explanation: gist.github.com/myronmarston/4503509 – Filip Bartuzi Sep 15 '14 at 6:44

I found this question while trying to do something similar. My solution can be found at https://gist.github.com/asmand/d1ccbcd01789353c01c3

What it does is to test the flex work time calculation of a week over Christmas, i.e. of the given week, only Monday and Friday are working days, the rest are holidays.

The solution is based around named subjects. I.e.

describe WeeklyFlexCalculator, "during Christmas week" do

  subject(:calculation) { WeeklyFlexCalculator.new(params).calculate }

  context "with no work performed" do
    it { should have(1).item }

    context "the week calculated" do
      subject(:workweek) {calculation[0]}

      its([:weekTarget]) { should eq 15.0 }
      its([:weekEffort]) { should eq 0.0 }

      context "the work efforts" do
        subject(:efforts) {workweek[:efforts]}

        it { should have(2).items }

        context "the first work effort" do
          subject(:effort) {efforts[0]}

          its([:target]) {should eq 7.5}
          its([:diff]) {should eq -7.5}
          its([:effort]) {should eq 0.0}
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

A lot of code is left out for brevity, but the complete example can be found in the linked gist.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, This is my preferred approach. – Joe Apr 8 '14 at 20:50
    
Very helpful. This also increased my knowledge of subject which isn't well documented. – eggmatters Mar 5 '15 at 19:06

I'm guessing that this functionality isn't built into Rspec because it would encourage more complicated specs and code. According to OOP best practices, classes should have a single responsibility. As a result, your specs should be concise and easy to understand. For the sake of conciseness and readability, a spec should only have one type of subject. There can be variations on this subject, but ultimately, they should all be based on the class/object you are describing.

If I were you, I would take a step back and really ask myself what I'm really trying to do. It seems like a code smell if you are finding yourself having multiple subjects of different class in the same spec. It's either a problem with how you're using Rspec, or your class is doing too much. Another thing to note is that you should be testing the behavior of your objects, and not details of what they are doing internally. Who cares if something is an array or a hash if it behaves how it should?

Take aways... Should your child subject really be a separate class with its own spec? Are you over testing implementation and not behavior?

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the comments but, in this case, the behavior is to produce a particular type of data structure and this is exactly what I'm testing. It's an API output, ready to be mapped to JSON. No ORM, no special classes. – Sim Oct 13 '11 at 5:14
    
It is not a "code" smell to encapsulate a complex object. This completely flies in the face of the Rails concept of defined relationships. This post has many Answers, each Answer has many comments. Ergo, we wish to to test whether or not a Comment may belong to a Post.Answer. We should relegate the behavior of the Comment to it's own RSpec, but a Post better encapsulate an Answer and an Answer had better encapsulate a Comment. This is a perfectly acceptable and widely used design pattern. – eggmatters Mar 5 '15 at 17:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.