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Classes such as Stream, StreamReader, StreamWriter etc implements IDispose interface. That means, we can call Dispose() method on objects of these classes. They've also defined a public method called Close(). Now that confuses me, as to what should I call once I'm done with objects? What if I call both?

My current code is this:

using (Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream())
{
   using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(responseStream))
   {
      using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(filename))
      {
         int chunkSize = 1024;
         while (!reader.EndOfStream)
         {
            char[] buffer = new char[chunkSize];
            int count = reader.Read(buffer, 0, chunkSize);
            if (count != 0)
            {
               writer.Write(buffer, 0, count);
            }
         }
         writer.Close();
      }
      reader.Close();
   }
}

As you see, I've written using() constructs, that automatically calls Dispose() method on each object. But I also call Close() methods. Is it right?

Please suggest me the best practices when using stream objects. :-)

MSDN example doesn't use using() constructs, and call Close() method:

Is it good?

share|improve this question
    
If yo're using ReSharper you could define this as a "antipattern" within the patter catalog. ReSharper will mark each usage as error/hint/warning regarding to your definition. It's also possible to define how ReSharper has to apply a QuickFix for such an occurrence. –  Thorsten Hans Sep 23 '11 at 6:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

A quick jump into Reflector.NET shows that the Close() method on StreamWriter is:

public override void Close()
{
    this.Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}

And StreamReader is:

public override void Close()
{
    this.Dispose(true);
}

The Dispose(bool disposing) override in StreamReader is:

protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    try
    {
        if ((this.Closable && disposing) && (this.stream != null))
        {
            this.stream.Close();
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (this.Closable && (this.stream != null))
        {
            this.stream = null;
            /* deleted for brevity */
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }
    }
}

The StreamWriter method is similar.

So, reading the code it is clear that that you can call Close() & Dispose() on streams as often as you like and in any order. It won't change the behaviour in any way.

So it comes down to whether or not it is more readable to use Dispose(), Close() and/or using ( ... ) { ... }.

My personal preference is that using ( ... ) { ... } should always be used when possible as it helps you to "not run with scissors".

But, while this helps correctness, it does reduce readability. In C# we already have plethora of closing curly braces so how do we know which one actually performs the close on the stream?

So I think it is best to do this:

using (var stream = ...)
{
    /* code */

    stream.Close();
}

It doesn't affect the behaviour of the code, but it does aid readability.

share|improve this answer
1  
"In C# we already have plethora of closing curly braces so how do we know which one actually performs the close on the stream?" I don't think that this is a big problem: The stream is closed "at the right time", i.e., when the variable goes out of scope and is no longer needed. –  Heinzi Sep 23 '11 at 6:38
4  
Hmm, no, that is a "why the heck is he closing it twice??" speed bump while reading. –  Hans Passant Sep 23 '11 at 8:14
4  
I disagree with the redundant Close() call. If someone less experienced looks at the code and doesn't know about using he will: 1) look it up and learn, or 2) blindly add a Close() manually. If he picks 2), maybe some other developer will see the redundant Close() and instead of "chuckling", instruct the less experienced developer. I'm not in favor of making life difficult for inexperienced developers, but I'm in favor of turning them into experienced developers. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 14 '11 at 23:58
2  
If you use using + Close() and turn /analyze on, you get "warning : CA2202 : Microsoft.Usage : Object 'f' can be disposed more than once in method 'Foo(string)'. To avoid generating a System.ObjectDisposedException you should not call Dispose more than one time on an object.: Lines: 41" So while the current implementation is fine with calling Close and Dispose, according to documentation and /analyze, it's not ok and might change in future versions of .net. –  marc40000 Feb 15 '12 at 9:39
2  
+1 for the good answer. Another thing to consider. Why not add a comment after the closing brace like //Close or as I do, being a newbie, I add a one liner after any closing brace thats not clear. like for example in a long class I would add //End Namespace XXX after the final closing brace, and //End Class YYY after the second final closing brace. Is this not what comments are for. Just curious. :) As a newbie, I saw such code, hense why I came here. I did ask the question "Why the need for the second close". I feel extra lines of code dont add to clarity. Sorry. –  Francis Rodgers Dec 12 '12 at 16:34

No, you shouldn't call those methods manually. At the end of the using block the Dispose method is automatically called which which will take care to free unmanaged resources (at least for standard .NET BCL classes such as streams, readers/writers, ...). So you could also write your code like this:

using (Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream())
using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(responseStream))
using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(filename))
{
    int chunkSize = 1024;
    while (!reader.EndOfStream)
    {
        char[] buffer = new char[chunkSize];
        int count = reader.Read(buffer, 0, chunkSize);
        if (count != 0)
        {
            writer.Write(buffer, 0, count);
        }
    }
}

The Close method calls Dispose.

share|improve this answer
    
a slight technical correction - it's Close that calls Dispose, not the other way around. :-) –  Enigmativity Sep 23 '11 at 6:32
    
@Enigmativity, correct. Thanks for pointing this out. I have updated my answer to take it into account. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 23 '11 at 6:37
    
I'm pretty sure you don't need to be using the first responseStream since that is wrapped by the reader which will make sure its closed when the reader is disposed. +1 nontheless –  Isak Savo Sep 23 '11 at 6:41
    
This is confusing when you said The Close method calls Dispose... and in the rest of your post, you're implying that Dispose() would call Close(), I shouldn't call the latter manually. Are you saying they call each other? –  Nawaz Sep 23 '11 at 6:43
    
@Nawaz, my post was confusing. The Close method simply calls Dispose. In your case you need Dispose in order to free unmanaged resources. By wrapping your code in using statement the Dispose method is called. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 23 '11 at 6:46

The documentation says that these two methods are equivalent:

StreamReader.Close: This implementation of Close calls the Dispose method passing a true value.

StreamWriter.Close: This implementation of Close calls the Dispose method passing a true value.

Stream.Close: This method calls Dispose, specifying true to release all resources.

So, both of these are equally valid:

/* Option 1 */
using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(filename)) { 
   // do something
} 

/* Option 2 */
StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(filename)
try {
    // do something
}
finally {
    writer.Close();
}

Personally, I would stick with the first option, since it contains less "noise".

share|improve this answer

On many classes which support both Close and Dispose methods, the two calls would be equivalent. On some classes, however, it is possible to re-open an object which has been Close'd. Some such classes may keep some resources alive after a Close, in order to permit reopening; others may not keep any resources alive on Close, but might set a flag on Dispose to explicitly forbid re-opening.

The contract for IDisposable.Dispose explicitly requires that calling it on an object which will never be used again will be at worst harmless, so I would recommend calling either IDisposable.Dispose or a method called Dispose on every IDisposable object, whether or not one also calls Close.

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