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Can anyone explain what's the difference between

/root/a[position()=1 or position()=2

and

/root/a[1 or 2]

? I'd assume the 2nd to be abbreviated form of the 1st, but Java XPath (Sun JDK 1.6.0) processor thinks otherwise. Following is my test application.

libxml2 library and also db2 XPath processor consider these paths different too. So it doesn't look like JDK bug.

import java.io.*;
import javax.xml.xpath.*;
import org.w3c.dom.*;

import org.xml.sax.InputSource;

public class XPathTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        //String xpathStr = "/root/a[position()=1 or position()=2]";
        String xpathStr = "/root/a[1 or 2]";

        XPathFactory xpf = XPathFactory.newInstance();
        XPath xp = xpf.newXPath();
        Reader irdr = new StringReader(
                "<root><a name=\"first\"/><a name=\"second\"/><a name=\"third\"/></root>");
        InputSource isrc = new InputSource(irdr);
        XPathExpression expr = xp.compile(xpathStr);
        Object result = expr.evaluate(isrc, XPathConstants.NODESET);
        NodeList nodes = (NodeList) result;
        for (int i = 0; i < nodes.getLength(); i++) {
            Node node = nodes.item(i);
            Element element = (Element) node;
            System.out.print(element.getNodeName() + " " + element.getAttributeNode("name"));
           System.out.println();
        }
    }
}
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I guess @Anton is not coming back but if he does he should definitely mark rusty's answer as correct –  AJP Dec 17 '13 at 17:34

4 Answers 4

I don't think [1 or 2] is evaluating how you think it is evaluating. or works on two boolean values. I suspect both 1 and 2 are evaluating as true. Therefore this expression is evaluating as true and essentially doing nothing, and will return all elements.

In general, position() can be used in expressions like [position() <= 5] whereas the index address can only ever select one element like [5].

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If '1' or '2' always evaluates to true when used as arguments of 'or' operator, why does it evaluate to false sometimes when used by '[]' (e.g. when /root/a path doesn't exist in the document)? –  Anton Sep 23 '11 at 11:05
1  
@Anton: In this case it still evaluates to true(), however the nodeset which it must filter out is the empty nodeset. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 23 '11 at 12:35
    
+1 for a correct explanation. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 23 '11 at 12:36

If the value in square brackets is a number [N], it is interpreted as [position()=N]. But [1 or 2] is not a number, so this rule does not apply.

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A numeric value in [] is treated as an index. The OR doesn't work for indexes on a way like yours ( [1 or 2] ). The right way is using position().

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I'm not sure about that. My understanding is that the content (so called predicate) of always considered to be a boolean expression. If integer number ('i' for example) is found there, it's expanded to boolean expression like –  Anton Sep 24 '11 at 9:57
    
... expanded to boolean expression like [position()=i] –  Anton Sep 24 '11 at 9:57
    
I'm not yet too skilled in using the comments marku. Trying again :-) I'm not sure about that. My understanding is that the content (so called predicate) of always considered to be a boolean expression. If integer number ('i' for example) is found there, it's expanded to boolean expression like [position()=i] and then evaluated. –  Anton Sep 24 '11 at 10:02

[1 or 2] evaluates to an "always true" predicate in .Net as well, so this behaviour appears consistent:

Here's the output from a the XPath of a .NET 3.5 XmlDocument

    // Returns first, second
    var ndl = dom.SelectNodes(@"/root/a[position()=1 or position()=2]");

    // Returns first, second and third
    ndl = dom.SelectNodes(@"/root/a[1 or 2]");

    // Returns first, second
    ndl = dom.SelectNodes(@"/root/a[1] | /root/a[2]");

Edit

In XPath 2, you can use the sequence functions index-of and exists to determine whether the given position is contained in a sequence of values:

/root/a[exists(index-of((1,2), position()))]
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This is consistent with my findings, but doesn't explain why 1 or 2 is sometimes treated as boolean and sometimes as number. –  Anton Sep 24 '11 at 10:04

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