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I want to write fraction value such as the picture below:

enter image description here

How do I write fraction value using html without using image?

NOTE: I don't want this 1 1/2 pattern but strictly just as the pic above

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Times have changed and we can now use MathML. See my answer below. –  bfrohs Apr 20 '12 at 16:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Try the following:

1<sup>1</sup>&frasl;<sub>2</sub>

This displays as:

112

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2  
This specific case could be shortened to 1&frac12;, but you are correct obviously for most other cases. –  James Allardice Sep 23 '11 at 8:08
    
Is that possible to use fraction hyphen instead of fraction slash? –  user774411 Sep 23 '11 at 8:12
    
@Downlalatech, see my answer. –  bfrohs Apr 10 '12 at 14:32
    
Good workaround if you cannot use CSS! –  Echt Einfach TV Sep 10 '14 at 7:05

The following code will be rendered just as the example in the question, and if the client does not support CSS it will be rendered as plain text, still readable as a fraction:

<p>1 <span class="frac"><sup>12</sup><span>/</span><sub>256</sub></span>.</p>
span.frac {
  display: inline-block;
  font-size: 50%;
  text-align: center;
}
span.frac > sup {
  display: block;
  border-bottom: 1px solid;
  font: inherit;
}
span.frac > span {
  display: none;
}
span.frac > sub {
  display: block;
  font: inherit;
}

The middle <span> serves only for the clients who do not render CSS - the text is still readable as 1 12/256 - and that's why you should place a space between the integer and the fraction.

You may want to change the font-size, because the resulting element may be a little taller than the other characters in the line, or you may want to use a relative position to shift it a little to the bottom.

But the general idea, as presented here, may be enough for the basic use.

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+1 and many thanks –  user774411 Sep 23 '11 at 9:03
    
Very nice. Here is the fiddle, how it looks like: jsfiddle.net/0L01p4m4 –  Echt Einfach TV Sep 10 '14 at 7:04
    
When writing two fractions with a plus sign, the plus sign is not aligned. You can change this by wrapping the + sign with: <span style="vertical-align:10px;">+</span>, see result jsfiddle.net/hx5oyotq/1 –  Echt Einfach TV Sep 12 '14 at 12:46
    
Thanks this help me.. :) –  ADT Apr 3 at 6:31

You can use <sup> and <sub> elements in conjunction with the fraction slash entity &frasl;

<sup>1</sup>&frasl;<sub>2</sub> is 12

UPDATE: I made this fiddle that shows a hyphenated fraction in HTML using a table.

   <table>
      <tbody>
        <tr>
          <td rowspan="2">1</td>
          <td style="border-bottom:solid 1px">1</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>            
            <td>2</td>
          </tr>
      </tbody>
   </table>
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Is that possible to use fraction hyphen instead of fraction slash? –  user774411 Sep 23 '11 at 8:13
    
Doesn't seem to be on the 1.4 specs, so I guess there's no standard entity. I'm no css expert, so I'd do it with a two row, one column <table> with a border in the middle. Quick and dirty. Here you can see it in action: Math in HTML –  Xavi López Sep 23 '11 at 8:29
1  
The table is not a legal element in a <p>, so it will not be possible to use this solution in a sentence, for example. Besides that, the <table> should not be used for things other than tabular data. –  Arsen7 Sep 23 '11 at 9:05
1  
Agree, your proposal is much better. –  Xavi López Sep 23 '11 at 9:15

Using MathML (Specification, Wikipedia):

<math>
 <mrow>
  <mn>1</mn>
  <mfrac>
   <mi>1</mi>
   <mi>2</mi>
  </mfrac>
 </mrow>
</math>

See the jsFiddle Example.

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2  
caniuse.com/mathml –  jedierikb Oct 26 '12 at 16:15
    
its not working on mobile browsers intead it shows as 1 1 2 –  Kartheek s Dec 14 '13 at 14:49
    
@Kartheeks As mentioned by jedierikb, MathML isn't fully supported by all browsers. It looks great in my default mobile browser though (Firefox), so it all depends on which browsers you're supporting. –  bfrohs Dec 16 '13 at 15:17

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