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Possible Duplicate:
Finding whether the element exists in whole html page

i would like make somethings:

<span id="one">one</span>
<span id="two">two</span>
<span id="three">three</span>
if (isset($("#one"))){
   alert('yes');
}

if (isset($("#two"))){
   alert('yes');
}

if (isset($("#three"))){
   alert('yes');
}

if (!isset($("#four"))){
   alert('no');
}

LIVE:

http://jsfiddle.net/8KYxe/

how can i make it?

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marked as duplicate by Robert Koritnik, Felix Kling, Tim Post Sep 23 '11 at 11:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What should be set to these spans? –  Robert Koritnik Sep 23 '11 at 9:00
2  
What is isset meant to mean? The span has some content? It exists? –  James Allardice Sep 23 '11 at 9:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted
if (($("#one").length > 0)){
   alert('yes');
}

if (($("#two").length > 0)){
   alert('yes');
}

if (($("#three").length > 0)){
   alert('yes');
}

if (($("#four")).length == 0){
   alert('no');
}

This is what you need :)

share|improve this answer
    
If id is not found it will throw error –  Minimihi Oct 2 '12 at 11:42

You can use length:

if($("#one").length) { // 0 == false; >0 == true
    alert('yes');
}
share|improve this answer
2  
No need to have the > 0 there as 0 is evaluated as false anyway. –  Richard Dalton Sep 23 '11 at 9:02
2  
@Richard: Right, but > 0 is more expressive and therefore easier to read. It might not be immediately clear to everyone that 0 evaluates to false. –  Felix Kling Sep 23 '11 at 9:04
1  
@Janis - val will only work if they are elements with a value property (e.g. input). It can't be used to check whether or not an element has content. –  James Allardice Sep 23 '11 at 9:06
1  
@JanisVeinbergs: And OP is obviously using SPAN elements. SO there is no value provided. Most likely they're looking for existing elements even though the question is very vague. –  Robert Koritnik Sep 23 '11 at 9:08
1  
@Tomalak: if condition is always evaluated to Boolean in the end, even though if you provide numbers, strings or anything else. –  Robert Koritnik Sep 23 '11 at 9:09
function isset(element) {
    return element.length > 0;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/8KYxe/1/


Or, as a jQuery extension:

$.fn.exists = function() { return this.length > 0; };

// later ...
if ( $("#id").exists() ) {
  // do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Tomalak - Thanks for the edit :) –  Richard Dalton Sep 23 '11 at 9:15
    
You're welcome. ;) –  Tomalak Sep 23 '11 at 9:22

php.js ( http://www.phpjs.org/ ) has a isset() function: http://phpjs.org/functions/isset:454

share|improve this answer

You can simply use this:

if ($("#one")){
   alert('yes');
}

if ($("#two")){
   alert('yes');
}

if ($("#three")){
   alert('yes');
}

if ($("#four")){
   alert('no');
}

Sorry, my mistake, it does not work.

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3  
$()always returns a jQuery object, which evaluates to true. –  Felix Kling Sep 23 '11 at 9:03
    
Won't work, jQuery always returns jQuery object. –  Usman Sep 23 '11 at 9:04
1  
@FelixKling: You better copy this comment... Maybe there'll be a third person answering this way... ;) –  Robert Koritnik Sep 23 '11 at 9:05
    
@Robert: :D..... –  Felix Kling Sep 23 '11 at 9:05
1  
And why is that? Because $("#four") returns an object that evaluates to true. Change no to yes and it will alert yes. You made the wrong conclusion. You use the same condition to test whether #three exists. What is the logic behind that? It is not important what is inside the statement, but what the condition is. See jsfiddle.net/eqpqR/1 –  Felix Kling Sep 23 '11 at 9:09
function el(id) {
  return document.getElementById(id);
}

if (el('one') || el('two') || el('three')) { 
  alert('yes');

} else if (el('four')) {
  alert('no');
}
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