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I have the following setup:

abstract class AParentLy{
   private $a;
   private $b;

   function foo(){
      foreach(get_class_vars(get_called_class()) as $name => $value){
         echo "$name holds $value";
      }
   }
}

class ChildClass extends AParentLy{
   protected $c='c';
   protected $d='d';
}

$object = new ChildClass();
$object->foo();

What I want it to output is:

c holds c
d holds d

What it does output is:

c holds c
d holds d
a holds
b holds

The get_called_class() method correctly outputs "ChildClass"

I'm fairly new to class inheritance in PHP and from what I can gather the problem lies somewhere in the so scope. But I can't figure out how to make it work.

(The somewhat questionable solution would be to just go ahead and add a great big if($name!='a' && $name!='b' ...~ into the mix. But I'm sure there must be another, more sane and stable way to do this)

share|improve this question
    
the function foo recognizes $a and $b hence you'll see them. Parent class does not know Child class, so it won't recognize it's privates. it won't recognize $c nor $d, since they are private. –  galchen Sep 23 '11 at 10:42
    
Not even if the Child class is the one originally called? And even if theres no way around making the child properties public, is there at least some way to make it not recognize the properties of the parent? –  someSyl Sep 23 '11 at 10:45
    
not even if the original class is called. if you will execute this in global scope, it won't recognize them either. you can make $c/$d protected though –  galchen Sep 23 '11 at 10:46
    
changed them to protected, which at least erases one of my problems. Thanks. –  someSyl Sep 23 '11 at 11:02
    
change get_class_vars(get_called_class()) to get_object_vars($this). i'll post the code –  galchen Sep 23 '11 at 11:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Had another go at the whole experiment this question was a part of.

The eventual solution (just in case anyone stumbles over this and has the same problem) I came to was to create the following method within the parent class:

function get_properties(){
    foreach(get_class_vars(get_called_class()) as $name => $value){
        if(!in_array($name,array_keys(get_class_vars('Parent')))){
            $r[$name]=$this->$name;
        }   
    }
    return $r;
}

with this you get every parameter (and their value) of the child class without any of the parent class. You'll have to change the function a bit if you ever change the class name, but at least for me this was a workable solution.

share|improve this answer
class Parent1 {
   //private $a;
   //private $b;

   function foo(){
      foreach(get_object_vars($this) as $name => $value){
         echo "$name holds $value";
      }
   }
}

class Child1 extends Parent1 {
   protected $c='c';
   protected $d='d';
}

Parent is a reserved name. in class Parent1 you can see $a and $b so removed. changed $c/$c to protected.

the other solution would be:

class Parent1 {
   private $a;
   private $b;
}

class Child1 extends Parent1 {
   private $c='c';
   private $d='d';

   function foo(){
      foreach(get_object_vars($this) as $name => $value){
         echo "$name holds $value<br>";
      }
   }
}

putting foo in Child

EDIT

Sorry to wake an old post. I think i have a preferable solution (actually 2 solutions) for this: The first one is to use a middle class that will create a barrier between the parent and the child:

abstract class Parent1 {
    private $a;
    private $b;
    abstract function foo();
}
class ParentClone1 {
    function foo(){
        foreach(get_object_vars($this) as $name => $value){
            echo "$name holds $value<br />";
        }
    }
}

class Child1 extends ParentClone1 {
    protected $c='c';
    protected $d='d';
}
$c = new Child1();
$c->foo();
// c holds c
// d holds d

The other solution is to use visibility:

If you call get_class_vars()/get_object_vars() from inside a class, it sees all the variables (including private/protected). If you run it from outside it will only see public:

function get_object_vars_global($class){
    return get_object_vars($class);
}
abstract class Parent1 {
    private $a;
    private $b;

    function foo(){
        foreach(get_object_vars_global($this) as $name => $value){
            echo "$name holds $value<br />";
        }
    }

}

class Child1 extends Parent1 {
    public $c='c';
    public $d='d';
}

$c = new Child1();
$c->foo();

since this will result in putting class fields as public, I'd go with the first solution.

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1  
Sadly unusable within the real code as both $a and $b are absolutely needed for other parts of the class to work. –  someSyl Sep 23 '11 at 11:23

Change the visibility of Child's properties to PROTECTED.

When properties are private, its not visibles.

More info at:

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.visibility.php

share|improve this answer

First some basic mistakes:

  1. Don't use a $ in a function name (here: $foo), this will result into a syntax error.
  2. You shouldn't name a class Parent, because it is a reserved word. Calling this would result into an error like Fatal error: Cannot use 'Parent' as class name as it is reserved

There is a good example how it works in the php manual, and there can be found this important sentence, which answers your question:

Class members declared public can be accessed everywhere. Members declared protected can be accessed only within the class itself and by inherited and parent classes. Members declared as private may only be accessed by the class that defines the member.

share|improve this answer
    
1.) the $foo was a typing mistake (too used to type the $ in front of foo). But thanks for pointing it out. 2.) this is a heavily simplified example code with class and property names for easy reading and understanding... –  someSyl Sep 23 '11 at 10:55
    
Understandable, happens to me all the time when I'm low on coffee! But take care when simplifying code - otherwise the people trying to solve your questions get distracted and solve the wrong problems. –  Bjoern Sep 23 '11 at 10:57
    
This answer doesn't address the question at all, as far as I can tell. –  Buttle Butkus Aug 19 '12 at 2:43
    
@ButtleButkus not anymore... but please keep in mind the question was edited a few times. –  Bjoern Aug 19 '12 at 9:04

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