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Say we have

Class A
{
   public:
   int _i;
   virtual int getI();
};
class B : public A
{  
   public:
   int _j;
   virtual int getI();
};

So assuming that the size of a class in memory is the sum of its members (i.e. ignoring padding or whatever might actually happen), what is the size of a B instance? Is it sizeof(A) + sizeof(int) + sizeof(vptr)? Or does a B instance not hold an A vptr in it's personal A instance, so that sizeof(b) would be sizeof(int) + sizeof(int) + sizeof(vptr)?

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3  
Sometimes I feel like writing a stupid compiler that generates crazy class layouts just to use on these kinds of questions. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 23 '11 at 13:35
    
That's not defined by the standard since it doesn't require an implementation to use vptr at all. Try it with your favorite compiler and see what sizeof tells you. –  Mat Sep 23 '11 at 13:36
1  
using identifiers that start with underscore is risky. but you can use identifiers that end with underscore. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 23 '11 at 13:44
    
@Alf: Why identifier start with underscore is risky ? –  Gob00st Sep 23 '11 at 13:55
    
because three forms of identifiers starting with underscore are reserved to implementation, and because that is because leading underscore is generally used to indicate an identifier belonging to implementation –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 23 '11 at 14:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's whatever the implementation needs to make the code work. All you can say is that it is at least 2 * sizeof(int), because objects of type B contain two ints (and possibly other things). In a typical implementation, A and B will share a vptr, and the total size will be just one pointer more than the two ints (modulo padding for alignment, but on most implementations, I don't think that there will be any). But that's just a typical implementation; you can't count on it.

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Any talk of a vtable is going to be specific to a certain implementation, since even the existance of a vtable isn't specified by the C++ standard - it's an implementation detail.

Generally an object will only have one pointer to a vtable, and that vtable will be shared among all objects of that type. The derived class will contain pointers in the table for each virtual function of the base classes plus each new virtual function that it didn't inherit, but again this is a static table and it is not part of the object.

To actually answer the question, the most likely outcome is sizeof(B) == sizeof(A::_i) + sizeof(B::_j) + sizeof(vptr).

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Why would you want to know? If you are going to use that in your program, I'd try to look for a more portable way than calculate it and either add a virtual function that returns the size, or perhaps use the runtime type infomration to get the correct type and then return the size.

(if you vote up or add comments I'll start decorating the answer)

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In addition to what James Kanze said, it is perhaps worth mentioning that (on a typical implementation) the B's virtual table will contain A's virtual table at its beginning.

For example:

class A {
    virtual void x();
    virtual void y();
};

class B : A {
    virtual void y();
    virtual void z();
};

A's virtual table:

  • A:x()
  • A:y()

B's virtual table:

  • A:x()
  • B:y()
  • B:z()

That's why an instance of B can get away with just one virtual table pointer.

BTW, multiple inheritance can complicate things quite a bit and introduce multiple virtual table pointers per object.

Always keep in mind that all this is an implementation detail and you should never write code that depends on it.

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I don't understand...why doesn't A's vtable contain A::z() ? –  azphare Sep 23 '11 at 13:53
    
@azphare Because B::z() can never be called on an instance of A. In fact, maybe class B wasn't even written by the programmer by the time the compiler needs to figure out how A's virtual table should look like (typical implementation will even let you write B without recompiling A). –  Branko Dimitrijevic Sep 23 '11 at 13:56
1  
Sorry for being slow, but what's the difference between A::y() and A::z()? B overrides them both... –  azphare Sep 23 '11 at 14:00
    
@azphare Heck I just realized I left z() in A. Edited the answer. Sorry! –  Branko Dimitrijevic Sep 23 '11 at 14:09

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