Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
from mechanize import Browser
br = Browser()
br.open('http://somewebpage')
html = br.response().readlines()
for line in html:
  print line

When printing a line in an HTML file, I'm trying to find a way to only show the contents of each HTML element and not the formatting itself. If it finds '<a href="whatever.com">some text</a>', it will only print 'some text', '<b>hello</b>' prints 'hello', etc. How would one go about doing this?

share|improve this question
7  
An important consideration is how to handle HTML entities (e.g. &amp;). You can either 1) remove them along with the tags (often undesirable, and unnecessary as they are equivalent to plain text), 2) leave them unchanged (a suitable solution if the stripped text is going right back into an HTML context) or 3) decode them to plain text (if the stripped text is going into a database or some other non-HTML context, or if your web framework automatically performs HTML escaping of text for you). –  Søren Løvborg Oct 15 '11 at 12:58
1  
for @SørenLøvborg point 2): stackoverflow.com/questions/753052/… –  Robert Nov 21 '13 at 16:40

12 Answers 12

up vote 175 down vote accepted

I always used this function to strip HTML tags, as it requires only the Python stdlib:

from HTMLParser import HTMLParser

class MLStripper(HTMLParser):
    def __init__(self):
        self.reset()
        self.fed = []
    def handle_data(self, d):
        self.fed.append(d)
    def get_data(self):
        return ''.join(self.fed)

def strip_tags(html):
    s = MLStripper()
    s.feed(html)
    return s.get_data()
share|improve this answer
1  
Beautiful Soup is awesome, but thanks so much for this also, this worked perfectly for me. –  Virgil Disgr4ce Apr 6 '11 at 22:24
2  
Two years+ later, facing the same issue, and this is a far more elegant solution. Only change I made was to return self.fed as a list, rather than joining it, so I could step through the element contents. –  directedition Sep 8 '11 at 14:04
25  
Note that this strips HTML entities (e.g. &amp;) as well as tags. –  Søren Løvborg Oct 15 '11 at 13:00
1  
You can directly use regular expressions. 3 lines code. –  Surya May 17 '12 at 16:28
22  
@surya I'm sure you've seen this –  tkone Jun 18 '12 at 15:34

I haven't thought much about the cases it will miss, but you can do a simple regex:

re.sub('<[^<]+?>', '', text)

For those that don't understand regex, this searches for a string <...>, where the inner content is made of one or more (+) characters that isn't a <. The ? means that it will match the smallest string it can find. For example given <p>Hello</p>, it will match <'p> and </p> separately with the ?. Without it, it will match the entire string <..Hello..>.

If non-tag < appears in html (eg. 2 < 3), it should be written as an escape sequence &... anyway so the ^< may be unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is almost exactly how Django's strip_tags does it. –  Bluu Mar 30 '11 at 20:50
5  
Note that this leaves HTML entities (e.g. &amp;) unchanged in the output. –  Søren Løvborg Oct 15 '11 at 13:01
7  
One can still trick this method with something like this: <script<script>>alert("Hi!")<</script>/script> –  Julio García May 23 '13 at 21:13
4  
DON'T DO IT THIS WAY! As @Julio Garcia says, it is NOT SAFE! –  rescdsk Sep 9 '13 at 15:51
1  
@rescdsk you could use that regex to strip "non-malicious" tags, then encode < as &lt; to make sure it's actually safe. –  Nick T Oct 29 '13 at 1:32

I needed a way to strip tags and decode HTML entities to plain text. The following solution is based on Eloff's answer (which I couldn't use because it strips entities).

from HTMLParser import HTMLParser
import htmlentitydefs

class HTMLTextExtractor(HTMLParser):
    def __init__(self):
        HTMLParser.__init__(self)
        self.result = [ ]

    def handle_data(self, d):
        self.result.append(d)

    def handle_charref(self, number):
        codepoint = int(number[1:], 16) if number[0] in (u'x', u'X') else int(number)
        self.result.append(unichr(codepoint))

    def handle_entityref(self, name):
        codepoint = htmlentitydefs.name2codepoint[name]
        self.result.append(unichr(codepoint))

    def get_text(self):
        return u''.join(self.result)

def html_to_text(html):
    s = HTMLTextExtractor()
    s.feed(html)
    return s.get_text()

A quick test:

html = u'<a href="#">Demo <em>(&not; \u0394&#x03b7;&#956;&#x03CE;)</em></a>'
print repr(html_to_text(html))

Result:

u'Demo (\xac \u0394\u03b7\u03bc\u03ce)'

Error handling:

  • Invalid HTML structure may cause an HTMLParseError.
  • Invalid named HTML entities (such as &#apos;, which is valid in XML and XHTML, but not plain HTML) will cause a ValueError exception.
  • Numeric HTML entities specifying code points outside the Unicode range acceptable by Python (such as, on some systems, characters outside the Basic Multilingual Plane) will cause a ValueError exception.
share|improve this answer

If you need to preserve HTML entities (i.e. &amp;), I added "handle_entityref" method to Eloff's answer.

from HTMLParser import HTMLParser

class MLStripper(HTMLParser):
    def __init__(self):
        self.reset()
        self.fed = []
    def handle_data(self, d):
        self.fed.append(d)
    def handle_entityref(self, name):
        self.fed.append('&%s;' % name)
    def get_data(self):
        return ''.join(self.fed)

def html_to_text(html):
    s = MLStripper()
    s.feed(html)
    return s.get_data()
share|improve this answer

There's a simple way to this:

def remove_html_markup(s):
    tag = False
    quote = False
    out = ""

    for c in s:
            if c == '<' and not quote:
                tag = True
            elif c == '>' and not quote:
                tag = False
            elif (c == '"' or c == "'") and tag:
                quote = not quote
            elif not tag:
                out = out + c

    return out

The idea is explained here: http://youtu.be/2tu9LTDujbw

You can see it working here: http://youtu.be/HPkNPcYed9M?t=35s

PS - If you're interested in the class(about smart debugging with python) I give you a link: http://www.udacity.com/overview/Course/cs259/CourseRev/1. It's free!

You're welcome! :)

share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks. Really simple. –  Jimmy Kane Aug 18 '13 at 20:22
1  
I wonder why this answer just got downvoted. It's a simple way to solve the problem without any lib. Just pure python and it works as shown by the links. –  Medeiros Aug 30 '13 at 23:27
1  
Probably people prefer libs to give them safety. I tested you code and passed, and I always prefer small code that I understand than using a lib and assuming that it's ok until a bug pops up. For me that's what I was looking for and again thanks. Regarding the downvotes, don't get in that mindset. People here should care about the quality and not the votes. Lately SO has become a place where everyone want's points and not knowledge. –  Jimmy Kane Aug 31 '13 at 14:24
1  
The problem with this solution is error handling. For example if you give <b class="o'>x</b> as input function outputs x. But actually this input is invalid. I think that's why people prefer libs. –  laltin Sep 13 '13 at 13:20
1  
It works with that input too. Just tested. Just realize that inside those libraries you'll find similar code. It's not very pythonic, I know. Looks like C or Java code. I think it's efficient and can easily ported to another language. –  Medeiros Sep 14 '13 at 21:18

If you want to strip all HTML tags the easiest way I found is using BeautifulSoup:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup  # Or from BeautifulSoup import BeautifulSoup

def stripHtmlTags(self, htmlTxt):
    if htmlTxt is None:
            return None
        else:
            return ''.join(BeautifulSoup(htmlTxt).findAll(text=True)) 

I tried the code of the accepted answer but I was getting "RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded", which didn't happen with the above block of code.

share|improve this answer
1  
I just tried your method because it seems cleaner, it worked, well kind of... it didn't strip input tags! –  kustomrtr Jun 24 '13 at 2:48
    
I find that a simple application of BeautifulSoup has a problem with whitespaces: ''.join(BeautifulSoup('<em>he</em>llo<br>world').find_all(text=True)). Here the output is "helloworld", while you probably want it to be "hello world". ' '.join(BeautifulSoup('<em>he</em>llo<br>world').find_all(text=True)) does not help as it becomes "he llo world". –  Finn Årup Nielsen Sep 2 at 9:22

You can use either a different HTML parser (like lxml, or Beautiful Soup) -- one that offers functions to extract just text. Or, you can run a regex on your line string that strips out the tags. See http://www.amk.ca/python/howto/regex/ for more.

share|improve this answer
1  
amk link is dead. Got an alternative? –  Will Nov 4 '10 at 13:17
2  
The Python website has good how-tos now, here is the regex how-to: docs.python.org/howto/regex –  jcoon Nov 4 '10 at 13:44
3  
In lxml: lxml.html.fromstring(s).text_content() –  Bluu Mar 30 '11 at 22:18
1  
Bluu's example with lxml decodes HTML entities (e.g. &amp;) to text. –  Søren Løvborg Oct 15 '11 at 13:02

Markupsafe is a good Python library for cross-site scripting prevention. It's included in Google App Engine, used by Jinja2 (2.7 and up), etc.

Here is their regular expression for stripping HTML tags (GitHub file link, look for _striptags_re):

re.sub(r'(<!--.*?-->|<[^>]*>)', '', text)

You can stop reading now, unless you want to know how it works...


Here's a string that I'll use for demonstration purposes:

>>> demo = '''<b>Normal stuff.</b>
... <!-- commented <b>out</b> -->
... <script<script>>alert("Hi!")<</script>/script>'''

Here's @mmmdreg's regular expression from above:

>>> print re.sub(r'<[^<]*?>', '', demo)
Normal stuff.
<!-- commented out -->
<script>alert("Hi!")</script>

Woops, it let the <script> through! (Thanks @Julio García). Your web site just logged your user's password and sent it to bad-guys.com. Cross-site scripting is the third most common vulnerability on the web.

Here's the Markupsafe version, with the special handling of HTML comments removed:

>>> print re.sub(r'<[^>]*>', '', demo)
Normal stuff.
out -->
>alert("Hi!")/script>

Better. One of the effects of that regular expression is that it's impossible to have matching open and close brackets - any matching brackets are deleted. So it's fixed the <script> problems.

It doesn't handle the comment very well, though. We probably don't want the contents of the comment to show up at all. In addition, comments often contain tags inside themselves, so special handling is useful:

>>> print re.sub(r'(<!--.*?-->|<[^>]*>)', '', demo)
Normal stuff.

>alert("Hi!")/script>

So this has removed the comment and de-fanged the script, as we would hope. Yay!

share|improve this answer

I have used Eloff's answer successfully for Python 3.1 [many thanks!].

I upgraded to Python 3.2.3, and ran into errors.

The solution, provided here thanks to the responder Thomas K, is to insert super().__init__() into the following code:

def __init__(self):
    self.reset()
    self.fed = []

... in order to make it look like this:

def __init__(self):
    super().__init__()
    self.reset()
    self.fed = []

... and it will work for Python 3.2.3.

Again, thanks to Thomas K for the fix and for Eloff's original code provided above!

share|improve this answer

You can write your own function:

def StripTags(text):
     finished = 0
     while not finished:
         finished = 1
         start = text.find("<")
         if start >= 0:
             stop = text[start:].find(">")
             if stop >= 0:
                 text = text[:start] + text[start+stop+1:]
                 finished = 0
     return text
share|improve this answer
1  
Does appending to strings create a new copy of the string? –  Nerdling Dec 18 '10 at 14:18
1  
@Nerdling - Yes it does, which can lead to some rather impressive inefficiencies in frequently used functions (or, for that matter, infrequently used functions that act on large blobs of text.) See this page for for detail. :D –  Jeremy Sandell Feb 8 '11 at 17:30
    
Does it test against quoted strings? No. –  Jimmy Kane Aug 31 '13 at 14:26

This method works flawlessly for me and requires no additional installations:

import re
import htmlentitydefs

def convertentity(m):
    if m.group(1)=='#':
        try:
            return unichr(int(m.group(2)))
        except ValueError:
            return '&#%s;' % m.group(2)
        try:
            return htmlentitydefs.entitydefs[m.group(2)]
        except KeyError:
            return '&%s;' % m.group(2)

def converthtml(s):
    return re.sub(r'&(#?)(.+?);',convertentity,s)

html =  converthtml(html)
html.replace("&nbsp;", " ") ## Get rid of the remnants of certain formatting(subscript,superscript,etc).
share|improve this answer
3  
This decodes HTML entities to plain text, but obviously doesn't actually strip any tags, which was the original question. (Also, the second try-except block needs to be de-indented for the code to even do as much). –  Søren Løvborg Oct 15 '11 at 13:07

The solutions with HTML-Parser are all breakable, if they run only once:

html_to_text('<<b>script>alert("hacked")<</b>/script>

results in:

<script>alert("hacked")</script>

what you intend to prevent. if you use a HTML-Parser, count the Tags until zero are replaced:

from HTMLParser import HTMLParser

class MLStripper(HTMLParser):
    def __init__(self):
        self.reset()
        self.fed = []
        self.containstags = False

    def handle_starttag(self, tag, attrs):
       self.containstags = True

    def handle_data(self, d):
        self.fed.append(d)

    def has_tags(self):
        return self.containstags

    def get_data(self):
        return ''.join(self.fed)

def strip_tags(html):
    must_filtered = True
    while ( must_filtered ):
        s = MLStripper()
        s.feed(html)
        html = s.get_data()
        must_filtered = s.has_tags()
    return html
share|improve this answer
    
If you call a function called html_to_text and you embed the text being output from that function inside html without escaping that text, then it is the lack of escaping, which is a security vulnerability, not the html_to_text function. The html_to_text function never promised you the output would be text. And inserting text into html without escaping is a potential security vulnerability regardless of whether you got the text from html_to_text or some other source. –  kasperd Jul 8 at 16:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.