Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm trying to work on a sample app. Trying to dig into ADO.NET Entity Framework. I get an employee back using a method with LINQ like this:

    public IList<Employee> FindByLastName(string lastName)
    {
        IList<Employee> emps;
        var e = from emp in _ctx.Employees where emp.LastName == lastName select emp;
            emps = e.ToList<Employee>();
        return emps;
    }

Then in one of my Unit Tests I have emps[0].Orders.Count > 0 and this comes back false. So my Orders property is not loading. What am I doing wrong?

UPDATE:
Any thoughts on how you incorporate this into this Load()/Include stuff into a repository pattern?

Do I have to do something lame like

public IList<Employee> GetEmployeeById(int id, bool includeOrders)
{

}
share|improve this question
    
I don't think theres a generic best way to do this, rather than saying include orders, I'd perhaps return lazy lists, lists that- when first used, will call the Load method under the covers first. –  meandmycode Apr 15 '09 at 20:36
    
Ok... I saw someone talking about lazy lists over on a blog post. I guess I'll have to inherit from Employee to replace the plain list with a lazy one. –  BuddyJoe Apr 15 '09 at 21:03
    
You'll probably need to have an Employee class that isn't associated with the Employee class defined by entity framework, and then map them in your repository. You'll also need to worry about making changes to the List of models, and how those changes are persisted back to the repo.. –  meandmycode Apr 15 '09 at 21:11
    
I've been down the same road with the EF, in my case I decided to postpone trying to build a repository pattern on top of it, but my reasons also included issues with validation and work units. –  meandmycode Apr 15 '09 at 21:12
    
I think this reinforces my decision to use NHibernate on everything else except this one Northwind sample for work. Maybe Microsoft can do better by version 2 (or 3). –  BuddyJoe Apr 15 '09 at 21:26

2 Answers 2

You also have the option of using an Include statement to load your Orders.

public IList<Employee> FindByLastName(string lastName)
{
    IList<Employee> emps;
    var e = from emp in _ctx.Employees.Include("Orders") where emp.LastName == lastName select emp;
        emps = e.ToList<Employee>();
    return emps;
}

This will result in a more complex join at the SQL side, but it does have the benefit of a single trip to the database and a smaller scope of records than the Load() example would return. I'd try them both and see what works best for you.

share|improve this answer

Use the Include method, and you may be better writing the query less linq like:

public IList<Employee> FindByLastName(string lastName)    
{
    return _ctx.Employees
        .Include("Orders")
        .Where(emp => emp.LastName == lastName)
        .ToList();  
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.