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I have a stored procedure that returns data.

I need to change the where clause based on parameters passed in.

For example, the parameters are:

@Region NVARHCAR(15)
@CountryCode NVARCHAR(2)
@ProductA BIT
@ProductB BIT
@ProductC BIT

If @Region is passed in, then the where should select by region, if @CountryCode is passed in then the where should select by country code.

For the products, if any of them are set to true, the where should select the data for that project.

So the statement could look like this if @Region is passed in and @ProductA and @ProductC are set to true:

SELECT *
FROM table
WHERE Region = @Region AND
(Product = 'ProductA' OR Product = 'ProductC')

Alternatively, the product conditional could be an IN statement.

If @CountryCode was passed in it would look as follows:

SELECT *
FROM table
WHERE CountryCode = @CountryCode AND
(Product = 'ProductA' OR Product = 'ProductC')

It's even possible that @CountryCode and @Region could be passed in.

Is there any way to do this with T-SQL and not dynamic SQL generated from the app?

Thanks

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3  
See Dynamic Search Conditions in T-SQL for the definitive article on this topic. –  Martin Smith Sep 23 '11 at 15:46
1  
The most common generalized way to handle this is Query By Example (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Query_by_Example) –  dkretz Sep 23 '11 at 16:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can always build the SQL statement as a string using your conditions.. then simply execute the resulting statement string using sp_executesql (a command which basically executes a Transact-SQL statement or batch that can be reused many times, or one that has been built dynamically)...

I understand you may not want build sql strings but it a solution.

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I'm going to try this, seems like the only thing that doesn't involve a whole bunch of if statements. –  Tom Sep 23 '11 at 16:50

You don't need to build a dynamic SQL statement, you just need to check the values of your parameters. Here is how I commonly build SQL clauses to achieve this:

WHERE ((@Region IS NULL) OR (Region = @Region))
AND ((@CountryCode IS NULL) OR (CountryCode = @CountryCode))
AND ((@ProductA = 0) OR (Product = 'ProductA'))
AND ((@ProductB = 0) OR (Product = 'ProductB'))
AND ((@ProductC = 0) OR (Product = 'ProductC'))

If your SQL is built like this, then you are only filtering on the Region column when you pass in a value for the @Region parameter. The same is true for CountryCode.

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Playing around with this all I get back is a NULL row. –  Tom Sep 23 '11 at 16:50
1  
@Tom I can't do your debugging for you. I'd recommend tackling this one parameter at a time. Are you passing in a NULL value for @Region? If so, then you shouldn't be filtering by that column. If you do pass in a value, then only records that match the value you passed in should be returned. –  Justin Helgerson Sep 23 '11 at 16:52
    
I think I have the where constructed correctly: notepad.cc/mamuge32 –  Tom Sep 23 '11 at 16:58

I'd simplify and write a stored procedure for each case. Or at least add procedural logic:

IF NOT @Region IS NULL ....

and have separate queries that can optimize on their own merits.

EDIT:

A couple principles that I think apply:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_%28computer_programming

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_responsibility_principle

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1  
The conditions given by the OP are already very simple. A separate stored procedure for each case sounds like overkill to me. –  Justin Helgerson Sep 23 '11 at 15:50
2  
@Ek0nomik - The problem with catch all queries is that the execution plans suck (though the recompile hint can help) –  Martin Smith Sep 23 '11 at 15:54
    
This will definitely work but I was trying to avoid it as there will be a lot of ifs with the number of conditions available. –  Tom Sep 23 '11 at 16:15
1  
Should't it correlate with the Use Cases you already have identified? It's already complicated enough to ask about on SO. –  dkretz Sep 23 '11 at 16:26
    
To do it with conditions it would have to look something like: if @region <> NULL then conditions under that for the 9 (?) different product combinations. Then the same for @countrycode <> null, I think I'm going to have to use sp_executesql –  Tom Sep 23 '11 at 16:48

This isn't necessarily the cleanest approach, but would avoid anything dynamic:

SELECT *
FROM table
WHERE CountryCode = isnull(@CountryCode, CountryCode) AND
Region = isnull(@Region, Region) AND
(Product = 'ProductA' OR Product = 'ProductC')
share|improve this answer
    
Playing around with this all I get back is a NULL row. I think I need to use sp_executesql –  Tom Sep 23 '11 at 16:50
    
Assuming the countrycode or region parameter is NULL if it's not included then this approach definitely does work... –  Timbo Sep 25 '11 at 15:37

If anything, the most direct approach (not necessarily the most elegant) is to set a default value for each parameter that is not a valid parameter value and perform a conditional check on each of them to see if the value contained in each parameter is different from the default value. Here I am assuming that the null value will never passed in as a valid value.

CREATE PROC sp_ProdInfo (
 @Region NVARHCAR(15) = NULL,
 @CountryCode NVARCHAR(2) = NULL,
 @ProductA BIT,
 @ProductB BIT,
 @ProductC BIT
) 
AS
 BEGIN
 -- other statements
 IF NOT @Region IS NULL
  BEGIN
   SELECT *
    FROM table
    WHERE Region = @Region AND
    (Product = 'ProductA' OR Product = 'ProductC')
  END
 ELSE
  BEGIN
   IF NOT @Country IS NULL
   BEGIN
    SELECT *
     FROM table
     WHERE CountryCode = @CountryCode AND
     (Product = 'ProductA' OR Product = 'ProductC')
   END
   ELSE
   BEGIN
    PRINT 'Neither Country nor Region was passed in.'
   END -- end inner if
  END -- end outer if
 -- other statements
 END
share|improve this answer

I would use a Common table Expression

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2  
And how does the CTE help here? –  Lucero Sep 23 '11 at 15:58

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