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In one application configured with FormsAuthentication, when a user access without the auth cookie or with an outdated one to a protected page, ASP.NET issue a HTTP 401 Unauthorized, then the FormsAuthentication module intercepts this response before the request end, and change it for a HTTP 302 Found, setting a HTTP header "Location: /path/loginurl" in order to redirect the user agent to the login page, then the browser goes to that page and retrieves the login page, that is not protected, getting an HTTP 200 OK.

That was a very good idea indeed, when AJAX was not being considered.

Now I have a url in my application that returns JSON data and it needs the user to be authenticated. Everything works well, the problems is that if the auth cookie expires, when my client side code call the server it will get a HTTP 200 OK with the html of the login page, instead a HTTP 401 Unauthorized (because the explained previously). Then my client side is trying to parse the login page html as json, and failing.

The question then is : How to cope with an expired authentication from client side? What is the most elegant solution to cope with this situation? I need to know when the call has been successful or not, and I would like to do it using the HTTP semantic.

Is it possible to read custom HTTP Headers from client side in a safe cross browser way? Is there a way to tell the FormsAuthenticationModule to not perform redirections if the request is an AJAX request? Is there a way to override the HTTP status using a HTTP header in the same way you can override the HTTP request method?

I need the Forms authentication, and I would like to avoid rewrite that module or write my own form authentication module.

Regards.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted
+100

I had the same problem, and had to use custom attribute in MVC. You can easy adapt this to work in web forms, you could override authorization of your pages in base page if all your pages inherit from some base page (global attribute in MVC allows the same thing - to override OnAuthorization method for all controllers/actions in application)

This is how attribute looks like:

public class AjaxAuthorizationAttribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
    {
        public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
        {
            if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAjaxRequest()
                && !filterContext.HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated
                && (filterContext.ActionDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(AuthorizeAttribute), true).Count() > 0
                || filterContext.ActionDescriptor.ControllerDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(AuthorizeAttribute), true).Count() > 0))
            {
                filterContext.HttpContext.SkipAuthorization = true;
                filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Clear();
                filterContext.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode = (int)System.Net.HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized;
                filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult("Unauthorized");
                filterContext.Result.ExecuteResult(filterContext.Controller.ControllerContext);
                filterContext.HttpContext.Response.End();
            }
        }
    }

Note that you need to call HttpContext.Response.End(); or your request will be redirected to login (I lost some of my hair because of this).

On client side, I used jQuery ajaxError method:

var lastAjaxCall = { settings: null, jqXHR: null };
var loginUrl = "yourloginurl";

//...
//...

$(document).ready(function(){
    $(document).ajaxError(function (event, jqxhr, settings) {
            if (jqxhr.status == 401) {
                if (loginUrl) {
                    $("body").prepend("<div class='loginoverlay'><div class='full'></div><div class='iframe'><iframe id='login' src='" + loginUrl + "'></iframe></div></div>");
                    $("div.loginoverlay").show();
                    lastAjaxCall.jqXHR = jqxhr;
                    lastAjaxCall.settings = settings;
                }
            }
    }

}

This showed login in iframe over current page (looking like user was redirected but you can make it different), and when login was success, this popup was closed, and original ajax request resent:

if (lastAjaxCall.settings) {
        $.ajax(lastAjaxCall.settings);
        lastAjaxCall.settings = null;
    }

This allows your users to login when session expires without losing any of their work or data typed in last shown form.

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1  
Good. Actually I am using MVC. I have my own authentication filter, so I just add a couple of lines like this "if not authenticated and it is an AJAX call: skip auth, return 401 and end the connection". And it works great! Thanks. –  vtortola Oct 3 '11 at 9:51
1  
Nice. Exactly what I need. FYI to use global action filters in mvc add them to RegisterGlobalFilters in global.asax. see Global Action Filters –  chg Feb 4 '12 at 13:53
    
This solution is not secure, because it does not handle caching properly. There's a bit of explanation here weblogs.asp.net/jgalloway/archive/2012/05/04/… and further on I suggest reading the source to AuthorizeAttribute - there's plenty of code in there that handles caching, and it's there for a good reason. –  DenNukem Oct 20 '12 at 21:30
2  
I don't believe that browser caches 401 errors :) And the rest of the code has nothing with authorization, Galloway's articles deal with CUSTOMIZING authentication/authorization process. There is no customization here, what this code does is check if request is ajax, and returning empty 401 response instead of login page if it is, so you can show login page in iframe or however you want to prevent user losing work context and any contents of the page he was on. Authorization is still performed using mvc's AuthorizeAttribute, if there is no AuthorizeAttribute any of this code is not executed. –  Goran Obradovic Oct 21 '12 at 8:53

I'm stealing this answer heavily from other posts, but an idea might be to implement an HttpModule to intercept the redirect to the login page (instructions at that link).

You could also modify that example HttpModule to only intercept the redirect if the request was made via AJAX if the default behavior is correct when the request is not made via AJAX:

Detect ajax call, ASP.net

So something along the lines of:

class AuthRedirectHandler : IHttpModule
{
    #region IHttpModule Members

    public void Dispose()
    {

    }

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        context.EndRequest+= new EventHandler(context_EndRequest);
    }


    void context_EndRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HttpApplication app = (HttpApplication)sender;
        if (app.Response.StatusCode == 302 
            && app.Request.Headers["X-Requested-With"] == "XMLHttpRequest"
            && context.Response.RedirectLocation.ToUpper().Contains("LOGIN.ASPX"))
        {
            app.Response.ClearHeaders();
            app.Response.ClearContent();
            app.Response.StatusCode = 401;
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

You could also ensure the redirect is to your actual login page if there are other legit 302 redirects in your app.

Then you would just add to your web.config:

  <httpModules>
    <add name="AuthRedirectHandler" type="SomeNameSpace.AuthRedirectHandler, SomeNameSpace" />
  </httpModules>

Anyhow. Again, actual original thought went into this answer, I'm just pulling various bits together from SO and other parts of the web.

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Well, as I said I am trying to avoid rewriting the http module, basically because I don't want to maintain another piece of code. Also, that solution is a little bit tricky, what I want redirect the AJAX call to another endpoint? I cannot block all the http 302, then I would be in a similar situation than now with http 401 :P Thanks. –  vtortola Sep 26 '11 at 12:06
2  
1. You're not "rewriting the HTTP module" you're adding a very short, simple one (which doesn't handle any actual authentication) to handle unauthorized AJAX requests and 2. As I said, the example doesn't include every filter imaginable, (or even desirable in this case) but the 302 redirect for your login page is either going to be a) A login page or b) a value set in your web.config. Either of those values should be easy to figure out and include in the condition. I don't think you're going to find a solution involving less than a dozen or so lines of code. –  Kevin Stricker Sep 26 '11 at 14:21
    
Anyhow, this topic has been discussed at length for ASP.NET forms: stackoverflow.com/questions/199099/… There are also a ton of cleverer server-side solutions for MVC if you happen to be using that and care to actually look for them. –  Kevin Stricker Sep 26 '11 at 14:46
    
I have seen all those solutions already, some of them are old (2008 that one), why do you think I specifically said I didn't want to write a module to cope with this? Maybe something new came up in the last asp.net versions. In the before last paragraph there are three questions, and those questions is what this post is about. If it's possible.. good, if not happy days as well. I know there are 1000 ways to make a workaround here, like in the most of the programming problems. –  vtortola Sep 26 '11 at 15:06
2  
Well, I answered your question: "Is there a way to tell the FormsAuthenticationModule to not perform redirections if the request is an AJAX request?" I'm sorry you aren't happy that the way to do that is a simple HTTP module. In addition, nobody on SO is hesitant to add new solutions to any of the old questions as they come up. Trust me, if there were a magic bullet for this, it would be tacked on to an old question somewhere. –  Kevin Stricker Sep 26 '11 at 15:11

I was having issues implementing the accepted answer. Chiefly, my error logs were getting filled with Server cannot set status after HTTP headers have been sent errors.

I tried implementing the accepted answer to question Server cannot set status after HTTP headers have been sent IIS7.5, again no success.

Googling a bit I stumbled upon the SuppressFormsAuthenticationRedirect property

If your .Net version is >= 4.5, then you can add the following code to the HandleUnauthorizedRequest method of your custom AuthorizeAttribute class.

public sealed class CustomAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAjaxRequest())
        {
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.SuppressFormsAuthenticationRedirect = true;
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.TrySkipIisCustomErrors = true;
            base.HandleUnauthorizedRequest(filterContext);
            return;
        }

        base.HandleUnauthorizedRequest(filterContext);
        return;
    }
}

The important part is the if block. This is the simplest thing to do if you are on .Net 4.5 & already have custom authorization in place.

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