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I have been trying this for long. I have a byte array, which I want to convert to ulong and return the value to another function and that function should get the byte values back.

I tried bitshifting, but it was unsuccessfull in few cases. Is there any alternate to bitshifting? or do you have any short example? Thanks for the help.

Here is the bitshift code that I used, I don't understant why the second entry is not 00000001:

using System;
using System.Text;


namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

         int[]responseBuffer = {0,1,2,3,4,5};


        UInt64 my = (UInt64)(((UInt64)(((responseBuffer[0]) << 40) & 0xFF0000000000)) |
              (UInt64)(((responseBuffer[1]) << 32) & 0x00FF00000000) |
              (UInt64)(((responseBuffer[2]) << 24) & 0x0000FF000000) |
              (UInt64)(((responseBuffer[3]) << 16) & 0x000000FF0000) |
               (UInt64)(((responseBuffer[4]) << 8) & 0x00000000FF00) | 
               (UInt64)(responseBuffer[5] & 0xFF));

         UInt64[] m_buffer = {(UInt64)((my >> 40) & 0xff),
                             (UInt64)((my >> 33) & 0xff) ,
                             (UInt64)((my >> 24) & 0xff) ,
                             (UInt64)((my>> 16) & 0xff) ,
                             (UInt64)((my>> 8) & 0xff) ,
                             (UInt64)(my& 0xff)};

         Console.WriteLine("" + m_buffer[1]);

            //string m_s = "";
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            for (int k = 0; k < 6; k++)
            {
                int value = (int)m_buffer[k];
                for (int i = 7; i >= 0; i--)
                {
                    if ((value >> i & 0x1) > 0)
                    {
                        sb.Append("1");
                        value &= (Byte)~(0x1 << i);
                    }
                    else
                        sb.Append("0");
                }
                sb.Append(" ");
            }   
                  Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
                  Console.Read();
    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
could you post your bitshift function? We could help sort it out. –  arviman Sep 23 '11 at 16:52
    
I just added it. –  Vikyboss Sep 23 '11 at 17:05
    
But still not sure what is wrong with my bitshifting. –  Vikyboss Sep 23 '11 at 17:27
1  
please see my answer. Also, why are you right shifting by 33 for the second item in the response buffer. –  arviman Sep 23 '11 at 17:47
2  
@Vikyboss: You need to cast before left-shifting. –  Ben Voigt Sep 23 '11 at 17:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Firstly I'd work out what went wrong with bitshifting, in case you ever needed it again. It should work fine.

Secondly, there's an alternative with BitConverter.ToUInt64 and BitConverter.GetBytes(ulong) if you're happy using the system endianness.

If you want to be able to specify the endianness, I have an EndianBitConverter class in my MiscUtil library which you could use.

(If you just need it to be reversible on the same sort of machine, I'd stick with the built in one though.)

share|improve this answer
    
What is EndianBitCOnverter? Is there any example For BitConverter Class? Searching for a good one for a byte array conversion. –  Vikyboss Sep 23 '11 at 17:00
    
Thanks man, ended up using BitConverter. –  Vikyboss Sep 23 '11 at 17:27
    
@Vikyboss: EndianBitConverter is like BitConverter but allows you to control the endianness. –  Jon Skeet Sep 23 '11 at 17:35

I'm not sure what the point of the left bitshifting and right bitshifting you're doing initially.(i'm assuming you're trying to generate Uint64 values to test your function with). To fix your function, just cast the numbers to UInt64 and then test them. Alternatively you can create long literals by using a suffix of l. such as UInt64[] responseBuffer = {0l,1l};

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            int[] responseBuffer = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
            List<UInt64> bufferList = new List<ulong>();
            foreach (var r in responseBuffer)
                bufferList.Add((UInt64)r);

            UInt64[] m_buffer = bufferList.ToArray();
            foreach (var item in m_buffer)
                Console.WriteLine(item);

            //string m_s = "";
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            for (int k = 0; k < m_buffer.Length; k++)
            {
                int value = (int)m_buffer[k];
                for (int i = 7; i >= 0; i--)
                {
                    if ((value >> i & 0x1) > 0)
                    {
                        sb.Append("1");
                        value &= (Byte)~(0x1 << i);
                    }
                    else
                        sb.Append("0");
                }
                sb.Append(" ");
            }
            Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
       }
share|improve this answer
    
I did right and left to show how the uint64 type element is created. But the creation is done in a separate program. Thanks for the help. –  Vikyboss Sep 24 '11 at 19:09

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