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I am struggling with how to write the correct CSS for positioning some data entry forms. I'm not sure what the "proper" way to do it is.

An example of what I am trying to create a layout for:

Last Name        Middle Initial            First Name            DOB
|||||||||||||    ||||||                    ||||||||||||||||      ||||||||||

City         State         Zip
||||||||     ||||          |||||||||

Basically I have my labels and the ||| are representing my form elements (text boxes, dropdowns etc). I don't know the proper way to create classes for these elements without just creating one time use classes that specify a specific width that is only for these elements.

Also, how do I get all of these elements aligned properly and multiple items per line? Do I need to float each element?

Would I do something like:

<div class="last-name">
   <div class="label">
       <label>Last Name</label>
   </div>
   <div class="field">
       <input type="text" />
   </div>
</div>

<div class="middle-initial">
   <div class="label">
       <label>Middle INitial</label>
   </div>
   <div class="field">
       <input type="text" />
   </div>
</div>

...

<div class="clear"></div>

last-name and middle-initial etc would all be classes that would be used once and floated to the left. I'm not sure if this is a good way to go about it or not? Is there a better way to do this kind of positioning with CSS so I can avoid using tables?

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1  
when you're using label elements, you should be specifying which element they refer to using the [for] attribute for accessibility. This also means that each form element should have an [id] which then means you can use the [id]s to apply styles. –  zzzzBov Sep 23 '11 at 17:27
    
It's an example not real code. I would of course use ids/names/fors –  Dismissile Sep 23 '11 at 17:38
    
@Dismissile... I think there are more issues you should consider re tables. See my edited answer below. –  Jason Gennaro Sep 23 '11 at 19:32

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not a bad thing to use table layout when the data you're laying out is a table! That's what you have here, imo: a table. So save yourself some grief and treat it that way. We've been so beat up by CSS purists and semantic-web lunatics that I suggest the pendulum has swung too far: now we tie ourselves in knots over-CSSifying our layouts. Or at least I do. I spend way too much time trying to avoid table layout.

The outcome is that a lot of my pages have to do browser checking. And the extra time (hey! the 80-20 rule again!) to deal with browser quirks is way more than it should be. I'd have saved a lot of time, and had more robust pages, if I'd just thought a little bit instead of going for the never-any-tables, always-pure-CSS solution every time. Table handling is solid like a rock in every browser with no problems and no frustrations.

Just my experience.

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I would choose to mark up this particular layout using fieldsets:

<form>
  <fieldset class="personal">
    <label>
      <span>Last Name</span>
      <input type="text" ... />
    </label>
    <label>
      <span>Middle Initial</span>
      <input type="text" ... />
    </label>
    ...
  </fieldset>
  <fieldset class="address">
    <label>
      <span>City</span>
      <input type="text" ... />
    </label>
  </fieldset>
</form>

I'd float all the labels, make the spans or inputs use display:block, and most everything should fall into place.

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You can put the input inside the label? I didn't even know that was possible! –  Tom Anderson Sep 23 '11 at 18:03
    
it's all in the spec. I highly recommend reading the entire thing top to bottom. Putting the input elements in the label saves on having to specify [id] and [for] attributes. –  zzzzBov Sep 23 '11 at 18:10

IMO, this is tabular data.

I don't think it's necessarily a shame to use a <table> for this.

Related discussion: Proper definition for "tabular data" in HTML

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I agree. Tables still have a place. –  Tisch Sep 23 '11 at 17:24
    
This is not tabular data. If this is a table, what is the meaning of the first column? –  Tom Anderson Sep 23 '11 at 17:33
    
I don't know. It doesn't feel like tabular data to me. It sort of makes me feel dirty. I suppose if enough people agree then I guess I just need to recondition my brain :) –  Dismissile Sep 23 '11 at 17:36
    
@TomAnderson I agree. Each "row" of this tabular data is completely different. They don't even have the same widths. I would be using a new table element for every row of data. That's why I don't like it. –  Dismissile Sep 23 '11 at 17:37
1  
It's not the rows that bother me. Each row is an instance of a kind of thing - in this case, a set of related fields. But there is no kind of column here. So it's not a table. It could well be a list. –  Tom Anderson Sep 23 '11 at 17:48

Here is my version without tables: http://jsfiddle.net/dy4bv/5/ (increase a little HTML part to fit all fields)

Maybe it will be helpful.

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You could always use display:table and display:table-cell.

So using your example code above, you would do something like this

div.last-name, div.middle-initial{
    display:table-cell;
    padding:1em;
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/5LBgp/

EDIT

A bit more context to add to the answers from @Pekka and @Pete Wilson:

I foresee two big problems with styling this as a table

  1. if you ever want to change the styling, you will need to hack away at the HTML, probably even redo it completely. Your code will be more future friendly if you use divs.
  2. screen readers and such will likely make a mess of it, not understanding that the table is not really a table.
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1  
+1 for the accessibility note. If you do decide to use tables to layout the form, please add role="presention" to the table to communicate to Assistive Technology (AT) that the contents are not tabular data. –  steveax Sep 23 '11 at 20:25

I am not a web developer, but i've had a crack.

This is based on @Samich's design, but instead of using a pile of divs with magic clearing divs interspersed, i've split the rows up into items in a ul. I use labels for the warm fuzzy semantic feeling. The styling is done by making the label-and-field divs inline-block, so they flow from left to right, but the labels and fields themselves block, so they stack vertically (this is a very crude idea, i know). As @zzzzBov pointed out, you can then use the field IDs to hang widths off.

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No, that is not tabular data. Here's a test if you're ever wondering if something is tabular data: What are the table headers?

As for the layout, whenever I get something that I have trouble laying out, I back up and ask if the design is the problem and in this case I think the answer to that question is: yes.

Is that a user friendly design? no. It's difficult to scan and will be slow for users to identify errors if there are submit errors.

Luke Wroblewski has some great information on his blog and in his book Web Form Design: Filling in the Blanks about how to design human friendly forms.

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Just to unload these 2 pennies...

The first column is "PropertyDescription" and the second column is "PropertyValue", while each row is a "Property" items -- voilà, a table!

Still prefer CSS, but this can certainly be classified as tabular data.

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