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I'm about to begin a large scale web app project. The premise of this project is it will be a destination website that aggregates content (content is to be collected with a crawler/bot that runs independently and at set intervals to index data provided from partners that have approved our technique) and displays this content to users. Users can tailor what content the platform presents them with by ranking content, in an attempt to give the platform data to determine what content the user is likely to find favorable. (Yes, I know this sounds just like stumbleupon.com)

The creator of this idea is non-technical, and he has previous experience developing websites using wordpress. Because of this, his first instinct was to call for a CMS in creating this project. My instinct as a developer that has extensive web development experience building web apps with PHP/Codeigniter, is that a CMS was never intended to be used to create such a purpose-specific tailor-made app like this -- and attempting to use one would create a lot of unnecessary overhead/clutter in the project.

I'm thinking it might be better to build a back-end interface to view/add/edit/remove content that the spider collects, since I imagine this is the only type of access/control that non-technical partners will need in this project. (possible also ban users, remove inappropriate comments on content, etc)

But what do you guys think, is there some sort of value that a CMS could provide to a project like this? Are there situations where it's a generally accepted rule that a CMS is good/bad? I'm coming from years of PHP app building using frameworks like codeigniter, and recently I've had to do work on a wordpress site -- which to me seemed like a disgusting mess of global variables, endless 'hooks' to get code to execute when/where you need it to, etc.

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I should add that an intended feature to add to all of this is users will be able to add their own content to our collection of aggregated content. Just another feature that makes me think this app is too 'unique' to be properly developed on top of a CMS.

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Another thing to add is scalability is a big concern. We want to build this to be able to handle anywhere from 200,000 - 2,000,000 - 20,000,000 unique visitors per month. That means using everything at our disposal, load balancing, memcached-caching, worker processes/servers, high-availability mysql and mongodb databases (for different purposes in our web app), content-delivery-networks, hosting asset files independently of application server, etc. I'm uneasy about giving up direct control over all of the code because in the past I've used my ability to touch everything to fine-tune any performance issues/bottlenecks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, most CMS out there are not only CMSs but also comprehensive PHP frameworks providing basic functionality. Having said that CMS are suitable more for websites that are content base like websites having a lot of articles. It is much easier to update and manage such sites by the users who aren't technical users. But when it comes to webApps they require much more interactions, e.g. a in a CRM application the inserts, reads, updates happen very frequently.

Others points that should be kept in mind are

1) would it be scale able if I use CMS for my app, If you think your app will grow in future, and you start building it from scratch, by the time your own piece of code would be transformed in a Framework for your app. Things will be much easy to update, adding some new functionality etc.

2) Flexibility, if you go with CMS you will have to constrained yourself in the CMS environment, What if you need a certain functionality in your website but you find nothing tailor made for that. In that case you will have to develop it your self which could take a long time than it would take otherwise.

3) Performance, CMS should be used for the purpose they are built for, a CMS will load everything it needs to function properly whereas much of these stuff you won't need for your app at all.

I would say to go with some Framework that is built to help the development process, like CakePHP, CodeIgniter, Yii etc.

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thank you for your thoughts. I have to say I'm very much in favor of your suggestion to go with a framework (specifically codeigniter) to accomplish this but I'm trying to keep my mind open to find the best solution to our business needs just in case my instincts to go with a framework are incorrect. –  Casey Flynn Sep 23 '11 at 18:05

This becomes really simple when you boil it down:

Do non-technical users need to have the ability to manage the content on the web site?

For pretty much any modern-day web site, the answer is "yes". The web is now mainstream and Facebook, Twitter, Wordpress, etc. have demonstrated that you don't need to be a programmer to create/maintain web content.

Your original question says as much. So, yes, you need a CMS (a system that makes content management possible by end-users).

So your real question is "Should I build my own CMS, or use an existing CMS?". Those custom interfaces you describe above, that's content management. You're describing building a basic CMS.

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To that question, I'll say: Making "content management" accessible to end-users is a lot harder than most programmers seem to anticipate. Even implementing a Rich Text (WYSIWYG) editor that isn't completely fragile & buggy is a monumental task.

And that's just the tip of the iceberg: permissions, versioning, workflow, taxonomy, analytics, personalization, feeds, comments, moderation, error logging, etc., etc.

These may or may not be features you need at launch, but as the web site matures these opportunities often need addressed.

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I work for a company that makes a CMS, so I'm biased but I consider the decision to create a CMS crazy. It's complicated from a technical perspective and even more complicated from a usability perspective. As a one-man-band (or even a ten-man-band) you don't have time to create all the features that are readily available with existing CMS packages. This means it's harder to evolve the web site to accommodate new ideas or modern practices. You'll be perpetually behind and playing catch up.

My advice, find a CMS platform that aligns with your client's needs, become involved with their community and build on this foundation. It might be harder in the short-term (comprising your PROGRAMMING ideals to accommodate a platform), but it better serves your client to not be dependent on some home-baked CMS that another developer will someday inherit (and hate).

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I'm thinking it might be better to build a back-end interface to view/add/edit/remove content that the spider collects, since I imagine this is the only type of access/control that non-technical partners will need in this project. (possible also ban users, remove inappropriate comments on content, etc)

Yes it would be a good idea, it will give you more control. Your non technical partner will only need these functions i guess. Or you can ask your partner that what kind/type of control he needs. I mean what specific use cases he will follow

But what do you guys think, is there some sort of value that a CMS could provide to a project like this? Are there situations where it's a generally accepted rule that a CMS is good/bad? I'm coming from years of PHP app building using frameworks like codeigniter, and recently I've had to do work on a wordpress site -- which to me seemed like a disgusting mess of global variables, endless 'hooks' to get code to execute when/where you need it to, etc.

I guess CMS can help you out also in this matter. What i recommend is DRUPAL in that case. DRUPAL is powerful enough to control this also you can create a custom list of actions (like add,edit or delete) in DRUPAL which your non-technical partner can easily access. DRUPAL has a lot of plugins (modules) , i'm sure you will find something like that or you can combine few plugins to get your job done. Using an existing CMS will give you confirmation that it is stable

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The consideration is always "What are the business needs and how can software support that?" You have to consider what the core needs are, then assess what the best approach may be, be it using a CMS, rolling your own system, or adapting an existing product to fit the business needs.

Access control does not justify using a CMS - a CMS is great for user generated and maintained content, something that (from your description) you're not really doing. It sounds to me like you have User-specific preferences, which is a part of a CMS, but not really a major service of them.

WordPress isn't a good example of a CMS, at least at its core - it has some of the core functionality of a CMS (users, publishing, etc) but again, you're collecting content into a central location and then customizing the display of that data. It doesn't really fall into the area of a CMS in my opinion.

Edit: Ok, so your users are adding to/creating content, you should then consider a CMS. Your challenge would be to add the aggregated content to your CMS seamlessly. It isn't impossible, and as mentioned, one of the established CMS platforms would be a good starting point.

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to give you a better idea of what this thing will do: users will have the option to add images, videos, or text. Essentially any uploads will be 'thrown into the pool' of other content (possibly flagged as user-uploaded). While a CMS might be helpful for this in certain situations, our overriding performance needs make me think it would be better to just build the content-adding utility. For example, we're going to use S3 and I want to give users the ability to upload videos directly to S3 to avoid occupying one of our web-processes for the upload duration to keep the app responsive –  Casey Flynn Sep 23 '11 at 18:00

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