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I'm trying code a basic application that will take the amount of numbers the user wants to input and then ask the user for the numbers, save the the numbers in a string array and then print them out in specific format.

this is what I have so far the only problem is I need to remove the last comma at the end of the output, I'm sure I'm going about this wrong... any assistance is appreciated.

import java.util.Scanner;
public class info {
    public void blue(){
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        Scanner dc = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("how many numbers do you have?");
        int a = dc.nextInt();
        System.out.println("enter your numbers");

        String index[]=new String [a];
        String i;

        for(int k = 0;k<index.length;k++){
            i = sc.nextLine();
            index[k]=i;
            }

            System.out.print("ensta = 'A' and entorp = 'P' and enaru# in (");

            for(int l = 0;l<index.length;l++){
            System.out.printf("'%s',",index[l]);
            }

            System.out.print(")");
    }
}
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2  
You'll want to work on your code indentation. You might get marks for creativity but not for readability. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 23 '11 at 17:54
    
possible duplicate of How to emit a comma-separated list? –  starblue Sep 23 '11 at 18:03
    
possible duplicate of Clearest way to comma-delimit a list (Java)? –  starblue Sep 23 '11 at 18:05
    
possible duplicate of Last iteration of for loop in java –  starblue Sep 23 '11 at 18:08
    
possible duplicate of What's the best way to build a string of delimited items in Java? –  starblue Sep 23 '11 at 18:10
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10 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
for(int l = 0;l<index.length;l++){
    if(l==index.length-1)
        System.out.printf("'%s'",index[l]);
    else
        System.out.printf("'%s',",index[l]);
}
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Thank you very much this works perfectly. –  Snarf Sep 23 '11 at 18:12
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 Arrays.toString(array).replaceAll("[\\[\\]]", "");
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This requires no if check for each element in your array:

if(index.length > 0) {
    for(int l = 0;l<index.length-1;l++){
        System.out.printf("'%s',",index[l]);
    }
    System.out.printf("'%s'",index[index.length-1]);
}
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1  
Will fail for no elements in array... –  dacwe Sep 23 '11 at 17:57
    
@dacwe: Good call! –  nicholas.hauschild Sep 23 '11 at 17:58
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Much cleaner approach could be,

String comma="";

for(int l = 0; l<index.length; l++)
{
   System.out.printf("'%s''%s'", comma, index[l]);
   // Now define comma
   comma = ",";
}
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I believe your parameters to printf need to be reversed. Right now, "a,b,c" would be printed as "ab,c," –  Dilum Ranatunga Sep 23 '11 at 18:03
    
@DilumRanatunga Thanks for catching that. –  tryurbest Sep 23 '11 at 18:07
    
Excellent answer (as it's almost the same as mine). Except you need to initialize comma for the first time through the loop, i.e. you should start with String comma=""; not just String comma; –  Jay Sep 23 '11 at 18:17
    
@Jay smade the change.. sorry I am new to Java.. you should consider voting the answer up ;) –  tryurbest Sep 26 '11 at 15:56
    
Good point -- upvoted. –  Jay Sep 26 '11 at 17:20
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This is displaying each string on its own line, with a comma at the end. If you want all of the words on one line, separated by commas, then replace

for(int l = 0;l<index.length;l++){
    System.out.printf("'%s',",index[l]);
}

with

StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder();

for(int l = 0;l<index.length;l++){
   buf.append(index[l]);

   if (l != (index.length - 1)) {
       buf.append(",");
   }
}

System.out.println(buf.toString());
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You can use substring method of String to strip the comma in the end. It is also better to use StringBuilder.append when doing concatenation in a loop.

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1  
I think that you meant StringBuilder rather than StringBuffer. I see nothing in his code to suggest the need for the overhead of this being thread-safe. But having said this, given the scale of his application, probably the use of StringBuffer or StringBuilder should be classified under unnecessary optimization as the rate limiting step will not be String object creation but rather user text entering. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 23 '11 at 17:55
    
Corrected. I was just pointing that instead of calling multiple sys outs one can construct the desired string and output it at once. –  Narendra Yadala Sep 23 '11 at 18:00
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}
System.out.print("\b");//<---------
System.out.print(")");

Why not use a String buffer and output it in the end?

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Been in the C# world for a while so the code may not be exact, but this should work

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for(int l = 0;l<index.length;l++){
  sb.Append(index[l] + ";");
}
sb.deleteCharAt(sb.Length - 1);
System.out.print(sb.ToString());

This will save your code from having to write to the output over and over, so there is less overhead as well.

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... at the expense of repeated string allocations. Use StringBuilder instead. –  Dilum Ranatunga Sep 23 '11 at 18:01
    
You're absolutely right, I fixed it –  DJ Quimby Sep 23 '11 at 18:03
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import apache StringUtils, then do

StringUtils.join( index, "," );
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Much simpler is:

String conj="";
for(int l = 0;l<index.length;l++){
  System.out.print(conj);
  System.out.print(index[l]);
  conj=",";  
}  

You have to do this sort of thing so often, I routinely write a little "joiner" class:

public class Joiner
{
  private String curr;
  private String conj;
  private StringBuilder value;

  public Joiner(String prefix, String conj)
  {
    this.curr=prefix;
    this.conj=conj;
    value=new StringBuilder();
  }
  public Joiner(String conj)
  {
    this("", conj);
  }
  public Joiner append(String s)
  {
    value.append(curr).append(s);
    curr=conj;
    return this;
  }
  public String toString()
  {
    return value.toString();
  }
}

Then you can build a concatenated string with code like:

Joiner commalist=new Joiner(",");
for (String one : many)
{
  commalist.append(one);
}
System.out.println(commalist.toString()); // or whatever you want to do with it

Or like to build a WHERE clause:

Joiner where=new Joiner(" where ", " and ");
if (foo!=null)
{
  where.append("foo="+foo);
}
if (bar!=null)
{
  where.append("bar="+bar);
}
String sql="select whatever from wherever"+where;
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