Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have:

class A():
    def f(self):
        print("running function, f from class A")
class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        A.__init__(self)
    def f(self):
        print("running function, f from class B")

and I make an instance of class B and call f on it, we all know we'll see the message about "from class B." But is there a way for me to inspect my object and make sure my sub-class has overridden my method? Something like:

obj = B()
assert(not obj.f.livesIn(A))
share|improve this question
    
Does this answer give you what you want: stackoverflow.com/questions/484890/… - it begins "You are looking for the undocumented function inspect.classify_class_attrs(cls)" –  Clare Macrae Sep 23 '11 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to force the child class to override, you can raise NotImplementedError().

Doing the inspection is possible too... And I see unutbu just posted an example, so I won't repeat it. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Previously, I said that you could use the abc module for this, but I wasn't thinking clearly. :) In python, an abstract base class is like a java interface rather than a java-style abstract class. NotImplementedError is the traditional way to emulate java's abstract keyword. –  tangentstorm Sep 24 '11 at 6:06
class A():
    def f(self):
        print("running function, f from class A")
class B(A):
    def f(self):
        print("running function, f from class B")
class C(A):
    pass

This shows that B.f does not equal A.f. So B must override f:

obj = B()
print(obj.__class__.f == A.f)
# False

This shows that C.f equals A.f. So C must not have overridden f:

obj = C()
print(obj.__class__.f == A.f)
# True
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, and much simpler than I was making it. Thank you. :) –  Daniel Miles Sep 23 '11 at 20:00
    
oops, spoke too soon. If you run it against self in a constructor of a super-class, it doesn't work. :( –  Daniel Miles Sep 23 '11 at 20:28
    
When a superclass constructor is called, the object is of the superclass type. It's morphed to the subtype only when the subtype constructor is called –  Dani Sep 24 '11 at 6:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.