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I have an existing python application (limited deployment) that requires the ability to run batches/macros (ie do foo 3 times, change x, do y). Currently I have this implemented as exec running through a text file which contains simple python code to do all the required batching.

However exec is messy (ie security issues) and there are also some cases where it doesn't act exactly the same as actually having the same code in your file. How can I get around using exec? I don't want to write my own mini-macro language, and users need to use multiple different macros per session, so I can't setup it such that the macro is a python file that calls the software and then runs itself or something similar.

Is there a cleaner/better way to do this?

Pseudocode: In the software it has something like: -when a macro gets called

for line in macrofile:
   exec line

and the macrofiles are python, ie something like:

property_of_software_obj = "some str"
software_function(some args)

etc.

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2  
Is the stuff you're exec'ing also Python scripts? Maybe you should post some code to show how you're doing it right now. –  Thomas Sep 23 '11 at 19:53
    
What security issues are there with using exec? Can you not just implement what the batch does in Python instead? –  Danny Sep 23 '11 at 19:54
    
Thomas - Yeah, what i'm execing is python scripts. Danny - There are lots of different batches, and sometimes users will want to change them while running the program, so putting the batch code directly into the software doesn't really work. –  Joe311 Sep 23 '11 at 19:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have you considered using a serialized data format like JSON? It's lightweight, can easily translate to Python dictionaries, and all the cool kids are using it.

You could construct the data in a way that is meaningful, but doesn't require containing actual code. You could then read in that construct, grab the parts you want, and then pass it to a function or class.

Edit: Added a pass at a cheesy example of a possible JSON spec.

Your JSON:

{
    "macros": [
        {
            "function": "foo_func", 
            "args": {
                "x": "y", 
                "bar": null
            }, 
            "name": "foo", 
            "iterations": 3
        }, 
        {
            "function": "bar_func", 
            "args": {
                "x": "y", 
                "bar": null
            }, 
            "name": "bar", 
            "iterations": 1
        }
    ]
}

Then you parse it with Python's json lib:

import json

# Get JSON data from elsewhere and parse it
macros = json.loads(json_data)

# Do something with the macros
for macro in macros:
    run_macro(macro) # For example

And the resulting Python data is almost identical syntactically to JSON aside from some of the keywords like True, False, None (true, false, null in JSON).

{
    'macros': [
        {
            'args': 
            {
                'bar': None, 
                'x': 'y'
            },
             'function': 'foo_func',
             'iterations': 3,
             'name': 'foo'
        },
        {
            'args': 
            {
                'bar': None, 
                'x': 'y'
            },
             'function': 'bar_func',
             'iterations': 1,
             'name': 'bar'
        }
    ]
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about something like that - but the batching also calls functions and some internal methods of the software. I don't have any JSON experience, is function calls etc. easy to handle in JSON parsing as well? –  Joe311 Sep 23 '11 at 20:03
    
You can only generate data from JSON, but you could use this to construct objects. You could specify function names as variables and use those to do attribute lookups on the module or class/instance objects in the software. –  jathanism Sep 23 '11 at 20:12
    
I added a rough concept of a potential JSON document. –  jathanism Sep 23 '11 at 20:28
    
Looks good, thanks! –  Joe311 Sep 23 '11 at 20:48
    
Woot, my pleasure! –  jathanism Sep 23 '11 at 21:13

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