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I have two observables. One is from Observable.fromEvent(..), where the underlying event is the user checking a Winforms checkbox. The other is Observable.Interval(..) which I subscribe to in order to do some IO, and I would like to prevent this observable from doing IO, whenever the checkbox is not checked.

I could do it like this:

var gui = new GUI();

var booleans = Observable
    .FromEvent<GUI.NewAllowHandler, bool>(
        h => gui.NewAllow += h,
        h => gui.NewAllow -= h)

Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
          .CombineLatest(booleans, Tuple.Create)
          .Where(t => t.Item2)
          .Select(t => t.Item1)
          .Subscribe(l => DoStuff(l));

but this has the overhead of mixing the booleans in and out of the stream. A nicer way of doing this would be, if I could generate a time-varying value from the booleans variable, which at all times had the value of the last event. Then I could do something like this:

var gui = new GUI();

var booleanState = Observable              // typeof(booleanState) == ???
    .FromEvent<GUI.NewAllowHandler, bool>(
        h => gui.NewAllow += h,
        h => gui.NewAllow -= h)
    .TimeValue()                           // hypothetical syntax


Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
          .Where(_ => booleanState) 
          .Subscribe(l => DoStuff(l));

, which to me seems much closer to the problem statement. Is there anything like this in Rx, or is there anything else, that could make such problems easier to handle?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to model the checkbox checked state as Behavior and not as Event stream (because behavior has always a value and this value changes over a period of time - which fits with checkbox checked state). So you can do something like:

var booleans = new BehaviorSubject<bool>(chk.Checked)
var chkEvents = ... //generate boolean observable from checkbox check event
chkEvents.Subscribe(booleans);

Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
 .Where(i => booleans.First())
 .Subscribe(i => DoIO());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, a Behaviour was what I was looking for. – Boris Sep 24 '11 at 15:21
1  
@Boris - this solution means that you start with an object that has state (chk.Checked), turn it into an observable, and then subscribe to that observable to create an object that has state (BehaviorSubject) and then use that in the Where clause. Why create the middleman? Just go with .Where(i => chk.Checked) - it's simpler. – Enigmativity Sep 25 '11 at 6:59
    
@Enigmativity - The middle man (the behavior) is the abstraction here for the interval based task which needs to know when to stop and when to start. Using checkbox in the interval task directly will create a strong dependency – Ankur Sep 25 '11 at 7:25
    
@Ankur - a BehaviourSubject isn't an abstraction - it's replacing one dependency with another - and it's more fragile. If it used a pure IObservable query then I'd agree it was an abstraction. – Enigmativity Sep 25 '11 at 7:30
    
@Enigmativity - BehaviorSubject does implement IObservable (and IObserver) as well, so you can pass it wherever a IObservable is required. My point was that in case you want to simulate the interval task with some Unit test then using a Behavior would be easy then a UI control. – Ankur Sep 25 '11 at 7:34

The Where statement in your interval should work with a properly scoped normal bool:

var booleans = Observable
    .FromEvent<GUI.NewAllowHandler, bool>(
        h => gui.NewAllow += h,
        h => gui.NewAllow -= h)

var isBoxChecked = false;
booleans.Subscribe(t => isBoxChecked = t);

Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
    .Where(_ => isBoxChecked)
    .Subscribe(l => DoStuff(l))

Edit: Per your comment, another way of doing it:

intervals = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));

booleans
    .Where(t => t)
    .SelectMany(_ => intervals.TakeUntil(booleans))
    .Subscribe(l => DoStuff(l))
share|improve this answer
    
Thank for your answer. This is another way of achieving my goal, and it is closer to my ideal syntax, but I think this is a little bit dangerous to accept. For instance, what if the event variable was not a bool, but another value whose size was more than 4 bytes, and the code was executed on a 32 bit machine? Wouldn't there be a race condition, with the risk of reading a half-updated value? – Boris Sep 23 '11 at 22:06

I'm going to give you two solutions. The first is a very simple and hopefully obvious one using only one observable. The second is a uses both observables.

Since you want to allow the IO only when the box is checked then this is the simplest approach:

Observable
    .Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
    .Where(_ => gui.IsChecked)
    .Subscribe(l => DoStuff(l));

No need at all for the other observable.

But if you really need to use it then the Switch() extension method is your best bet. Try this:

booleans
    .Select(b => b == true
        ? Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)) 
        : Observable.Empty<long>())
    .Switch()
    .Subscribe(l => DoStuff(l));

It's pretty clean and helps to show that there are empty periods if the checkbox is not ticked.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I also need to do other stuff with the boolean observable, so I prefer to keep it as a stream. – Boris Sep 24 '11 at 15:14
    
@Boris - the first option doesn't prevent you from having a stream. Keep in mind that observables are like enumerables in that each time you subscribe to them you get a new subscription to the underlying source, not a shared subscription to the observable. Nevertheless the second option should them work for you. – Enigmativity Sep 25 '11 at 1:26
    
Thanks, Just to note, the second option has a slightly different behaviour than my initial approach, and I don't like it as much, since the Observable.Interval(...).Where(...) still seems clearer to me. Your first option is by far the simplest approach of all the answers, and I like it, but for reasons explained in a response under the accepted answer, I still prefer the BehaviourSubject approach. Thanks again. – Boris Sep 25 '11 at 12:21

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