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This case (simplified to the point that it doesn't make much sense) is handled correctly by the F#'s type system:

type HumanBeing() = class end
type Animal() = class end

type CreatureController() =
    member this.Register creature = creature

type CreatureFactory() =
    let anAnimal = new Animal()
    let aHuman = new HumanBeing()

    member this.GiveMeAnAnimal  =
        (new CreatureController()).Register anAnimal

    member this.GiveMeAHuman =
        (new CreatureController()).Register aHuman

The type of CreatureController.Register is correctly inferred: 'a -> 'a, thus it can be called with the two different arguments.

Now the following version has a slight difference: instead of passing creature as argument to CreatureController.Register, it is passed to its constructor.

type HumanBeing() = class end
type Animal() = class end

type CreatureController(creature) =
    member this.Register = creature

type CreatureFactory() =
    let anAnimal = new Animal()
    let aHuman = new HumanBeing()

    member this.GiveMeAnAnimal =
        (new CreatureController(anAnimal)).Register

    member this.GiveMeAHuman =
        (new CreatureController(aHuman)).Register

This second example does not compile because Register is inferred as Animal, so you cannot call new CreatureController(aHuman).

(Note: in this simplified case the Factory is obviously flawed because it always return the same animal/humanBeing, but this behavior does not change if you replace anAnimal/aHuman with functions.)

Why isn't CreatureControlled created as generic in the second case? Is this a compiler limitation? Am I missing something very basic (still learning...)?

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2  
I think the summary is - you can't have a constructor that would be itself generic (but a generic method is completely fine). Generic constructor means that the whole type is generic and this has to be declared explicitly. –  Tomas Petricek Sep 23 '11 at 23:43
    
As evident from the answers, Type inference sometimes can be a bit of a headache, I still prefer to put type annotations to make things more clear. In your case if you have put type annotations on controller constructor that would have helped you find the problem –  Ankur Sep 24 '11 at 7:28
    
@Tomas your sentence summarizes it pretty well. –  Francesco De Vittori Sep 24 '11 at 14:10
2  
@Ankur I've found that most of the time It Just Works (tm) and I find myself less "distracted" by types. I think you are missing a great feature if you never use type inference. –  Francesco De Vittori Sep 24 '11 at 14:12
    
@Francesco De Vittori : I do use type inference, but mostly when the inferred type is nearby ex: let a = 10 and not something where the type infer is based on later usage as that makes reading code not so easy (without IDE it would be worse). –  Ankur Sep 24 '11 at 16:40
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the first case, as you stated, Register is inferred to be generic, so it works. In the second case, you're passing two different types to the constructor of a non-generic class. A concrete type must be inferred in this case. If you add type args to creature controller, it works:

type HumanBeing() = class end
type Animal() = class end

type CreatureController<'T>(creature:'T) =
    member this.Register = creature

type CreatureFactory() =
    let anAnimal = new Animal()
    let aHuman = new HumanBeing()

    member this.GiveMeAnAnimal =
        (new CreatureController<_>(anAnimal)).Register

    member this.GiveMeAHuman =
        (new CreatureController<_>(aHuman)).Register

The difference is type parameters must be explicit on types, but not on functions. Also, constructors may only deal with type parameters declared by the type itself.

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In the constructor case, it is likely (or at least ambiguous) that you meant for the type itself to be generic, e.g.

type CreatureController<'T>(creature:'T) = ...

and in F#, generic arguments on type definitions must always be explicitly specified.

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Sorry I must pick one answer, but thanks this helped too! –  Francesco De Vittori Sep 24 '11 at 14:08
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