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Is there a more pythonic way to write __getitem__ than the following? The issue is checking type and doing different things depending on the type of the parameter in the call.

class This():
    def __init__(self, name, value):
        self.name, self.value = name, value

class That():
    def __init__(self):
        self.this_list = []
    def add_this(self, this):
        self.this_list.append(this)
    def __getitem__(self, x):
        if isinstance(x, int):
            return self.this_list[x] # could wrap in try/except for error checking
        elif isinstance(x, str):
            for this in self.this_list:
                if this.name == x:
                    return this
            return None


a = This('a', 1)
b = This('b', 2)
c = That()
c.add_this(a)
c.add_this(b)
print c[1].name
print c['a'].name
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1  
More information about the larger goal might be helpful. –  Eric Wilson Sep 23 '11 at 20:12
    
@Eric: The goal is to be able to call with either that[int] or that[str] and have it return the appropriate item, rather than writing separate int and string getters –  foosion Sep 23 '11 at 20:14
1  
Could That be replaced by a dict? –  Eric Wilson Sep 23 '11 at 20:17
    
@Eric: classes are much clearer than dicts in what I'm actually doing. Each of this and that have more data and more methods than this simplified example. I started out with a dict of lists of dicts (or worse) and it became unwieldy. –  foosion Sep 23 '11 at 20:23
    
Why do you want to be able to index by number? Show the code where you might do so. –  Karl Knechtel Sep 23 '11 at 20:38
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are quite a few options, but I think there is not one best choice. It depends on your use case and preferences. Just to give you a few hints:

Do you really have to store the data in a list? In your example you could use a dictionary and insert the object twice: Once using the integer as key and once using the string as a key. That would make your __getitem__ quite simple. ;-)

Another option would be to make your interface more explicit and use byInt/byString methods. You should choose better names of course.

If you give more details about what you really want to do, I could propose more alternatives.

share|improve this answer
    
Another way to ask the question is whether having separate byInt and byString methods is better (for your favorite definition of better) than checking type. Checking type seemed smelly to me, but maybe that's just me –  foosion Sep 23 '11 at 20:26
    
Checking type smells in most cases, but there are exceptions - at least in my opinion. byInt/byString are only examples of course. byId and byName or something like that would probably make your code more readable, which is usually "better" according to my favorite definition of better. ;-) –  Achim Sep 23 '11 at 20:43
    
A prior iteration had included get_by_name and get_by_index methods. Then I thought fewer methods would be cleaner. You may well be right that separate methods would be more readable, which is better, absent some good reason. –  foosion Sep 23 '11 at 20:53
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You are almost always better off testing the behavior of the kind of item you want rather than explicitly testing for type. In your case, I'd simply try to get the desired item by index first and catch TypeError to check by name.

def __getitem__(self, key):
    try:
        return self.this_list[key]
    except TypeError:
        try:
            return next(item for item in self.this_list if item.name == key)
        except StopIteration:
            raise KeyError("key `%s` not found" % key)

Note that this will automatically work with slices too, since in this case the key will be a slice object and that will work fine with the [...] notation.

You should probably be using a dict rather than a list inside your class, though, rather than searching a list for an object attribute. Exceptions would be if you really need slicing or if the names can be changed by code outside your class.

Another (perhaps slightly unconventional) possibility is to implement the special method __eq__() on your This class, allowing it to be compared to a string, so that if the class's name attribute is (say) "Jerry", then This("Jerry", 0) == "Jerry". Then you don't actually need the container class and can just use a regular list:

class This(object):
    def __init__(self, name, value):
        self.name, self.value = name, value
    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.name == other

thislist = [This("Jerry", 42), This("Amy", 36)]

"Jerry" in thislist       # True
thislist.index("Amy")     # 1

The syntax for accessing an item by name is still a little hairy:

thislist[thislist.index("Amy")]

But you can simply subclass list and combine this with my previous suggestion, which becomes simpler and more generic, since it works with any object that knows how to compare itself to whatever kind of key you're using:

class That(list):
    def __getitem__(self, key):
        try:
            return list.__getitem__(self, key)
        except TypeError:
            return list.__getitem__(self, self.index(key))

thislist = That([This("Jerry", 42), This("Amy", 36)])
thislist["Amy"].value       # 36
share|improve this answer
    
Easier to ask for forgiveness than permission does seem sensible here. The question then becomes is this more readable than get_by_index and get_by_name methods –  foosion Sep 26 '11 at 21:01
1  
I think it can be made readable, by using variable names that make it clear whether an index or a key is being used. However, one downside is that the [] notation implies near-instantaneous retrieval, which definitely isn't the case when doing a linear search for an object attribute! For that reason, maybe overloading find() would be better. –  kindall Sep 27 '11 at 2:01
1  
... better yet, define the comparison methods on the object so they work with objects with a name attribute as well as with strings, then a subclass of list will do ya. –  kindall Sep 28 '11 at 1:09
    
kindall, I'm being dense and don't really understand your last comment. Could you please expand or outline some code? –  foosion Sep 28 '11 at 1:59
1  
@foosion: done. –  kindall Sep 28 '11 at 16:00
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Is there a more pythonic way to write getitem in the following?

Only slightly. __getitem__ is used by both sequences, where int's and slice's are used, and by mappings, where pretty much anything can be used. It looks like you are implementing both sequence-type and mapping-type interfaces, so you're stuck with checking type.

Missing two things:

  • support for slices (but only put it in if you want your That to support it)
  • raising an exception for failure (returning None in this case is not pythonic)

Here's an updated __getitem__:

def __getitem__(self, x):
    if isinstance(x, int):
        return self.this_list[x]
    elif isinstance(x, slice):
        return self.this_list[slice]
    elif isinstance(x, str):
        for this in self.this_list:
            if this.name == x:
                return this
        return None
    raise KeyError("invalid key: %r" % x)

At this point you have two possible exceptions being raised

  • IndexError (if x is outside the range of this_list)
  • KeyError (if the name is not found, or something besides str or int was passed in)

This may be fine for you, or you might want to create a custom Exception that gets returned in all cases:

class LookupError(Exception):
    "x is neither int nor str, or no matching This instance found"

Here's the updated code (Python 2.x):

class LookupError(IndexError, KeyError):
    "x is neither int nor str, or no matching This instance found"

class This():
    def __init__(self, name, value):
        self.name, self.value = name, value

class That(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.this_list = []
    def add_this(self, this):
        self.this_list.append(this)
    def __getitem__(self, x):
        try:
            if isinstance(x, int):
                return self.this_list[x]
            elif isinstance(x, slice):
                return self.this_list[slice]
            elif isinstance(x, str):
                for this in self.this_list:
                    if this.name == x:
                        return this
            raise KeyError("invalid key: %r" % x)
        except (IndexError, KeyError), err:
            raise LookupError(err.message)


a = This('a', 1)
b = This('b', 2)
c =  That()
c.add_this(a)
c.add_this(b)
print c[1].name
print c['a'].name
try:
    print c[2.0]
except LookupError, e:
    print e
try:
    print c['c']
except LookupError, e:
    print e
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You can define two private methods __getitem_int() and __getitem_str(). Then you can use getattr() to get handle to proper method depending of type(x).__name__ and call type-specific method.

See how KantGenerator.parse() is implemented in dive into python parsing xml example.

share|improve this answer
    
Having byInt and byString methods, or checking type, seems simpler than this approach –  foosion Sep 23 '11 at 20:30
1  
@foosion: I agree. (deleted previous comment). You mean to simple if type ... instead of using getattr(), right? It's simple but less flexible. You will have to add another if ... to support another type. –  Michał Šrajer Sep 23 '11 at 20:38
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