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I am just wondering whether the below code is valid?

<c:choose>
    <c:when test="${empty example1}">
    </c:when>
    <c:when test="${empty example2}">
    </c:when>
    <c:otherwise>
    </c:otherwise>              
</c:choose>
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8  
It is. What's the problem you're having with it? Or did you just not bother to run it? – BalusC Sep 23 '11 at 20:25
    
the 2nd <c:when> isnt getting called so I wasnt sure whether its valid to write multiple <c:when>. as you said its valid I will try changing the conditions probably. – Jay Sep 23 '11 at 20:26
    
If the 2nd isn't getting called, then the condition just don't match or was already matched before. Please ask a bit more concrete technical question than just a rhetorical question. – BalusC Sep 23 '11 at 20:38

In a c:choose, the first when for which the test is true is the winner. In the c:choose below, if "first test" and "second test" are both true, then the "Kpow" h2 will be added to the html page and the "Blammy" will not.

<c:choose>
  <c:when test="first test">
    <h2>Kpow</h2>
  </c:when>
  <c:when test="second test">
    <h2>Blammy</h2>
  </c:when>
</c:choose>
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<c:choose>
    <c:when test="${empty example1}">
    </c:when>
  <c:when test="${empty example2}">
  </c:when>
  <c:otherwise>
  </c:otherwise>              
</c:choose>

This code is nothing but

 switch(int i){
   case 1:
   ...
   break;
   case 2:
   ...
   break;
   default:
   ...
   break;
}
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3  
Not really - in your second example (if it's Java) you would need the break statements to make it work exactly like <c:choose>. – Matt May 10 '13 at 13:06
    
+1 for comprehensible and difference – Khwarezm Shah Dec 10 '13 at 7:51

Yes its valid. Why not just try it though? Look up JSTL for more info.

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