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Our team frequently performs customization to various packages distributed with RHEL/CentOS. Our workflow involves installing the SRPM, executing rpmbuild -bp to unpack and patch the source, making our changes and creating a .patch to be included in the specfile, and building the new customized SRPM for later use with mock:

$ rpm -i grub-0.97-13.5.1.src.rpm
$ rpmbuild -bp rpmbuild/SPECS/grub.spec
$ cp -a rpmbuild/BUILD/grub-0.97 grub-0.97.orig
$ cd rpmbuild/BUILD/grub-0.97
  # Make modifications, generate .patch against ".orig" copy
$ vim rpmbuild/SPECS/grub.spec
  # Add custom .patch to specfile, update version, etc
$ rpmbuild -bs rpmbuild/SPECS/grub.spec
$ mock -r default-x86_64.cfg rpmbuild/SRPMS/grub-0.97-13.5.1.custom-1.src.rpm

This process works well but we are not currently using any form of source control to keep track of our modifications and specfile changes. Based on my (admittedly basic) understanding of git, I think it should be possible to inject it into this workflow and leverage some of its power to optimize a few of the steps (in addition to the normal benefits of SCM).

For example, rather than creating a copy of the source to diff against later we could create an initial commit of the upstream patched source and then make our modifications. When ready, use git format-patch to create our feature patch and add it to the specfile.

I would also like to version control the specfiles as well, though I'm not sure how best to achieve that.


So my question is threefold:

  1. Does anyone out there use SCM when customizing upstream packages?
  2. What is the most effective way to integrate git into our workflow?
  3. Is there a better workflow that is more conducive to version-controlled custom RPM authoring?

Extra credit: Assuming a git-based workflow, how would I structure a central repository to accept pushes? One repo with submodules? One repo per package?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Does anyone out there use SCM when customizing upstream packages?

Sure. This is pretty common.

What is the most effective way to integrate git into our workflow? Is there a better workflow that is more conducive to version-controlled custom RPM authoring?

I don't know about most effective, but here's what I do. I start with the following ~/.rpmmacros file:

%_topdir    %(echo ${RPM_TOPDIR:-$HOME/redhat})
%_specdir   %{_topdir}/PACKAGES/%{name}/%{version}
%_sourcedir %{_topdir}/PACKAGES/%{name}/%{version}/sources
%_rpmdir    %{_topdir}/PACKAGES/%{name}/%{version}/rpms

If I install a package (say, foo-1.0-1.src.rpm), the spec file ends up in ~/redhat/PACKAGES/foo/1.0/foo.spec, and the source tarball (and any patches) end up in ~/redhat/PACKAGES/foo/1.0/sources.

Now I initialize the package directory as a git repository:

cd ~/redhat/PACKAGES/foo/1.0
git init
git add foo.spec sources/*.patch
git ci -m 'initial commit'

There's nothing special about recording changes to the spec file:

git ci -m 'made some really spiffy changes' foo.spec

If I need to make changes to package source files, I do this:

rpmbuild -bp foo.spec

And now I create a temporary git repository:

cd ~/redhat/BUILD/foo-1.0
git init
git add .
git ci -m 'initial commit'
git tag upstream

From this point on, if I make any changes I can generate patches against the upstream package like this:

git diff upstream

Or if I've made a series of commits, I can use git's format-patch command to create a series of patches:

$ git format-patch upstream
0001-added-text.patch
0002-very-important-fix.patch

And these can be copied into the appropriate sources directory and added to the spec file.

Note that the temporary git repository I've created for tracking changes in the build directory will be obliterated next time I run rpmbuild.

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Great answer. One addition: I usually use mock for minor dev and rpmbuild would complain if dependencies aren't installed. A dash of --nodeps added to rpmbuild makes everyone happy. –  Mansour Sep 29 '13 at 15:03

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