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There are lot of questions about replacing multi-newlines to one newline but no one is working for me.
I have a file:

first line
second line MARKER

third line MARKER
other lines

many other lines

I need to replace two newlines (if they exist) after MARKER to one newline. A result file should be:

first line
second line MARKER
third line MARKER
other lines

many other lines

I tried sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/MARKER\n\n/MARKER\n/g' Fail.
sed is useful for single line replacements but has problems with newlines. It can't find \n\n

I tried perl -i -p -e 's/MARKER\n\n/MARKER\n/g' Fail.
This solution looks closer, but it seems that regexp didn't reacts to \n\n.

Is it possible to replace \n\n only after MARKER and not to replace other \n\n in the file?
I am interested in one-line-solution, not scripts.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you were on the right track. In a multi-line program, you would load the entire file into a single scalar and run this substitution on it:

s/MARKER\n\n/MARKER\n/g

The trick to getting a one-liner to load a file into a multi-line string is to set $/ in a BEGIN block. This code will get executed once, before the input is read.

perl -i -pe 'BEGIN{$/=undef} s/MARKER\n\n/MARKER\n/g' input
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Thank you! @ikegami post was earlier but your solution much clearer! It exactly what I asked. –  oluckyman Sep 23 '11 at 23:22
    
@oluckyman, I intentionally avoided this answer as it needlessly loads the entire file in memory. But since you appear to prefer shorter answers, I've added an even terser solution to my answer. –  ikegami Sep 24 '11 at 0:24
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Your Perl solution doesn't work because you are search for lines that contain two newlines. There is no such thing. Here's one solution:

perl -ne'print if !$m || !/^$/; $m = /MARKER$/;' infile > outfile

Or in-place:

perl -i~ -ne'print if !$m || !/^$/; $m = /MARKER$/;' file

If you're ok with loading the entire file into memory, you can use

perl -0777pe's/MARKER\n\n/MARKER\n/g;' infile > outfile

or

perl -0777pe's/MARKER\n\K\n//g;' infile > outfile

As above, you can use -i~ do edit in-place. Remove the ~ if you don't want to make a backup.

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thanks, @ikegami! but result of both examples is empty file. –  oluckyman Sep 23 '11 at 23:08
    
@oluckyman, It wasn't empty, it contained only the blank lines that were suppose to be removed. I had the condition inverted. Fixed. –  ikegami Sep 23 '11 at 23:10
    
Great! Can you explain for non-perl-people how it works? –  oluckyman Sep 23 '11 at 23:19
1  
@oluckyman, For each line, 1) Prints the current line if it's not preceded by a marker line (by checking $m) or if it's not blank. 2) Note in $m whether the current line is a marker line. –  ikegami Sep 24 '11 at 0:10
1  
@oluckyman, The third version: 1) Tell Perl that the consider the whole file one line (-0777), then 2) for each line, 2A) replace every "\n" preceded by "MARKER\n" with nothing, and 2B) print out the line. –  ikegami Sep 24 '11 at 0:17
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awk:

kent$  cat a
first line
second line MARKER

third line MARKER
other lines

many other lines

kent$  awk 'BEGIN{RS="\x034"} {gsub(/MARKER\n\n/,"MARKER\n");printf $0}' a
first line
second line MARKER
third line MARKER
other lines

many other lines
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See sed one liners.

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Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. This is especially true given the large number of unrelated one-liners in that link. I couldn't find one that addresses this specific question by searching the document for "newline" or "\n\n" which I'd expect to be mentioned by such a solution. –  Flexo Sep 23 '11 at 23:06
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awk '
  marker { marker = 0; if (/^$/) next }
  /MARKER/ { marker = 1 }
  { print }
'
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This can be done in very simple sed.

sed '/MARKER$/{n;/./!d}'
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can you explain how that works –  justintime Sep 25 '11 at 7:20
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This might work for you:

 sed '/MARKER/,//{//!d}'

Explanation:

Deletes all lines between MARKER's preserving the MARKER lines.

Or:

sed '/MARKER/{n;N;//D}'

Explanation:

Read the next line after MARKER, then append the line after that. Delete the previous line if the current line is a MARKER line.

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