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I'm working on some embedded software where there is some static information about "products". Since the information for a certain product never changes during execution I would like to initialize these data structures at compile time to save some space on the stack/heap.

I made a Product class for the data, intending to make a huge array of all the products in the system and then do lookups in this structure, but I haven't figured out quite how to get it working. The arrays are giving me loads of trouble. Some psuedo code:

class Product {
    int m_price;
    int m_availability[]; // invalid, need to set a size
    ... etc

    // Constructor grabbing values for all members
    Product(int p, int a[], ...);
}

static const Product products[] = 
{
    Product(99, {52,30,63, 49}, ...), // invalid syntax
    ...                    
}                     

Is there a way to making something like this work? The only thing I can think of would be to organize by attribute and skip the whole Product object. I feel that would make the whole thing harder to understand and maintain though.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how I might best organize this kind of data?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
What compiler are you using? The { } array syntax as a parameter is valid in C++11 AFAIK (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B1x#Initializer_lists). For the array sizes you can use templates (template<int arraySize> ... ). –  Karel Petranek Sep 23 '11 at 23:18
    
We're using gcc from cygwin for our PC compiles, but not sure what we use for our target compiles. No C++11 support as far as I can tell though. –  Marcus Sep 24 '11 at 10:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

An old school C style static array of structs sounds like a perfect match to your requirements. Initializes at compile time, zero runtime overhead, no use of stack or heap. It's not a co-incidence that C is still a major player in the embedded world.

So (one recipe - plenty of scope to change the details of this);

// in .h file
    class Product {
    public: // putting this first means the class is really a struct
        int m_price;
        int m_availability[4]; 
        //.... (more)
    };
    extern const Product product_array[];
    extern const int     product_array_nbr;

// in .cpp file
    const Product product_array[] =
    {
        {
             23,
             {56,1,2,4},
             //....(more)
        },
        {
             24,
             {65,1,2,4},
             //....(more)
        },
        //....(more)
    };

    const int product_array_nbr = sizeof(product_array)/sizeof(product_array[0]);
share|improve this answer
    
Ah yes, this does indeed seem like a solution. I did not say in my description, but the size of the inner arrays can vary between products. I suppose I could set an upper limit, and waste some space in the cases it's smaller. The ROM usage is not as critical anyway. –  Marcus Sep 24 '11 at 10:18
1  
@Marcus: Make it static const as you originally had it to "encourage" the compiler to locate the array in ROM. Your compiler's documentation will probably document whether it does that, and/or it may have explicit extensions to specify ROM location. You cannot have a variable length container and static const initialisation, all instances of the object must be the same size, and a variable length container such as a vector requires run-time construction. –  Clifford Sep 25 '11 at 7:55
1  
@Marcus: I've taken a somewhat similar approach to what Bill suggested, and also in a situation similar to yours (variable length, but known at compile time). My approach was to declare the "m_availability" member not as an array (which must have a fixed size), but as a pointer to another array of const ints. Each array of const ints can be different lengths, and each of them is also initialized where defined (all this is done at compile time). The slight modification to Bill's code is located here, I hope it makes sense. –  Dan Sep 25 '11 at 17:25
    
@Clifford: I'll keep the static const, and poke the compiler boys to put it in the right place, cheers. @Dan: Ooh pointers to objects in ROM, hadn't thought of that. It would mean splitting up the location of the data though (not that the mega array will be a pretty thing to look at either way). It would save a lot space though, especially in the event I one day need a product with m_availability of size 100 ;) Thank you all! –  Marcus Sep 25 '11 at 22:30

A couple of years ago when I was working in embedded we needed to explicitly control the memory allocation of our structures.

Imagine this type of struct :

.h file

template<class T,uint16 u16Entries>
class CMemoryStruct
{
public:
    /**
    *Default c'tor needed for every template
    */
    CMemoryStruct(){};
    /**
    *Default d'tor
    */
    ~CMemoryStruct(){};
    /**
    *Array which hold u16Entries of T objects. It is defined by the two template parameters, T can be of any type
    */
    static T aoMemBlock[u16Entries];
    /**
    *Starting address of the above specified array used for fast freeing of allocated memory
    */
    static const void* pvStartAddress;
    /**
    *Ending address of the above specified array used for fast freeing of allocated memory
    */
    static const void* pvEndAddress;
    /**
    *Size of one T object in bytes used for determining the array to which the necessary method will be invoked
    */
    static const size_t sizeOfEntry;
    /**
    *Bitset of u16Entries which has the same size as the Array of the class and it is used to specify whether
    *a particular entry of the templated array is occupied or not
    */
    static std::bitset<u16Entries> oVacancy;
};


/**
*Define an array of Type[u16Entries]
*/
template<class Type,uint16 u16Entries> Type CMemoryStruct<Type,u16Entries>::aoMemBlock[u16Entries];
/**
*Define a const variable of a template class
*/
template<class Type,uint16 u16Entries> const void* CMemoryStruct<Type,u16Entries>::pvStartAddress=&CMemoryStruct<Type,u16Entries>::aoMemBlock[0];
template<class Type,uint16 u16Entries> const void* CMemoryStruct<Type,u16Entries>::pvEndAddress=&CMemoryStruct<Type,u16Entries>::aoMemBlock[u16Entries-1];
template<class Type,uint16 u16Entries> const size_t CMemoryStruct<Type,u16Entries>::sizeOfEntry=sizeof(Type);
/**
*Define a bitset inside a template class...
*/
template<class Type,uint16 u16Entries> std::bitset<u16Entries> CMemoryStruct<Type,u16Entries>::oVacancy;

Depending on your compiler and environment you could manipulate the area of where the static allocation take place. In our case we moved this to the ROM which was plenty. Also note that depending on your compiler i.e. Greenhills compilers, you may need to use the export keyword and define your static members to the .cpp file.

You can use the start and end pointers to navigate through the data. If your compiler supports full STL you may want to use std::vectors with custom allocators and overloaded new operators which would save your memory to somewhere else than the stack. In our case the new operators were overloaded in such a way that all the memory allocation was done on predefined memory structures.

Hope I gave you an idea.

share|improve this answer

In C++98/03, you cannot initialize arrays in a constructor initializer.

In C++11, this has been fixed with uniform initialization:

class Product
{
  int m_availability[4]; 
public:
  Product() : m_availability{52,30,63, 49} { }
};

If you need the data to be provided in the constructor, use a vector instead:

class Product
{
  const std::vector<int> m_availability; 
public:
  Product(std::initializer_list<int> il) : m_availability(il) { }
};

Usage:

extern const Product p1({1,2,3});
share|improve this answer

Memory for the static variables is still reserved when the code is actually executing -- you won't be saving space on the stack. You might want to consider use of vectors instead of arrays -- they're easier to pass and process.

share|improve this answer
2  
While static variables do consume memory they do not consume stack space, so he will exactly be saving stack space. The benefit is that stack is a valuable run-time resource (and in many embedded systems rather small), static allocation where possible reserves that resource for other purposes. Moreover static const declaration allows the array to be located in ROM where applicable. –  Clifford Sep 24 '11 at 9:23

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