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I have a Binary Search Tree that I'm making and I implemented the Insert node code as follows:

BSTNode * BST::Insert(const std::string & v){
    BSTNode * node = new BSTNode(v);
    if (root == NULL){
        root = node;
    } else if (root->value.compare(v) > 0) {
        Insert(root->left, node);
        //recursive insert the method
    } else if (root->value.compare(v) < 0) {
        Insert(root->right, node);
    } else {
        delete node;
        return NULL;
    }
    size++;
    return node;
}

Followed by the recursive insert method in my header file (it has private access):

void Insert(BSTNode* current, BSTNode* node){
    if (current == NULL){
        current = node;
    } else if (current->value == node->value){
        delete node;
    } else if (current->value < node->value) {
        Insert(current->left, node);
    } else if (current->value > node->value){//if (parent->value < node->value) {
        Insert(current->right, node);
    }
}

When the recursive function sets the pointer and then returns, the changes I made to the pointer DON'T stay.

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As a side note, you should never, ever, ever have actual function or method declarations in your header file. Those should always, always, always be in a .c, not a .h. –  Keith Irwin Sep 24 '11 at 0:19
2  
@KeithIrwin: That's not true at all. You just need to inline them if you're going to do it. It's still only a good idea for special cases or templates though. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 24 '11 at 0:21
1  
@KeithIrwin : If I could downvote your comment, I would. :-/ –  ildjarn Sep 24 '11 at 0:25
1  
@Keith: Who writes C++ in .c files? And in C++ there are quite often good reasons to write functions in headers. For non-template functions I would agree, but your advice is misleadingly (and incorrectly) generalised. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 24 '11 at 0:39
1  
So, yes, there are rare exceptions, but a new programmer should first get in the habit of not putting any code in header files and then eventually, as they become more experienced, they'll understand when it's okay. –  Keith Irwin Sep 24 '11 at 1:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem here is that current is a local variable with a copy of the value of the pointer. It's not the same variable that you pass in. If you want to modify the pointer in place, your method should accept either a pointer to the pointer or a reference to the pointer. The easiest way to do this would be to just modify current to be a reference to a pointer. The resultant code would look like this:

void Insert(BSTNode* &current, BSTNode* node){
    if (current == NULL){
        current = node;
    } else if (current->value == node->value){
        delete node;
    } else if (current->value < node->value) {
        Insert(current->left, node);
    } else if (current->value > node->value){//if (parent->value < node->value) {
        Insert(current->right, node);
    }
}

In general, you should keep in mind that pointers are just values which tell you the memory location of something. So they're really just numbers. And when they're passed into a function, unless there's a reference, they're passed by the value. So your function just sees the number, not the variable which contained the number.

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Aahhh!! I didn't think that the compiler would copy the pointer and then send it to the function. Ooohh... So then, I should be able to just declare the function prototype in the private section of my header file and the I can still write the function inside my cpp file then? –  Bob Sep 24 '11 at 0:49
    
Yes. Prototypes should go in the header and implementation goes in the .cpp file. That way, the header can be included in multiple files which need to use the same classes without the code getting compiled into both (which will generate linker errors). What's happening is that any include directive literally copies everything from the .h into your .cpp file. If the same .h is copied into two different .cpp files, then that code is included twice. When a function or method implementation is included in two different .o files, the linker gives an error because it doesn't know if they're the same –  Keith Irwin Sep 24 '11 at 17:16
void Insert(BSTNode*& current, BSTNode* node)

is the correct prototype for the function given. Nothing else need be changed. The reason why this is necessary is described well by Keith.

I would also add that in general you should be wary of conditionally deleting pointers passed as arguments to a function -- you're placing a burden on the code outside that function to determine whether the memory address it refers to is still valid or not. Consider use of boost's shared_ptr instead.

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Sadly since its a school project, I'm not allowed to use boost or anything in the C++ Standard Library except string ... but if you know of a better way without boost I'm all ears! :) –  Bob Sep 24 '11 at 0:51

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